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Skills/Tools for Personal Trainers

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Visualization Training for Golfers

Who Benefits Most From Visualization Training?

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | March 30, 2020 |

Do you have clients who seem to be able to deeply imagine how a movement would feel in the body? If you do, kinesthetic imagery training may help them improve their sports skills. New research shows that golfers who could imagine the physical feeling of putting while visualizing the action improved their subsequent ability to putt more accurately.

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Coaching Rotation Using Anti-Rotation

By Pete Holman, MS, PT | August 16, 2019 |

When you watch someone hit a golf ball, throw a punch or simply retrieve groceries from the car, it’s evident that human movement occurs in all three planes of motion. A review of basic core anatomy—major muscles attached to the trunk, above the ischial tuberosity and below the superior aspect of the sternum—reveals that 87.5% of the core muscles are oriented either diagonally or horizontally, and one action that these muscles perform is rotation (Santana 2000).

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Balance and Stability

By Sarah Schrenk, MS | October 18, 2018 |

Balance, which is essential for integrated movement, declines as we age. However, you can teach group fitness students how to maintain balance while also taking them through some fun, creative core exercises. Having a strong trunk and hip complex helps us maintain balance for years to come. In your next class, incorporate these multiplanar exercises targeting the core musculature and the gluteals. Each move is done in a standing position, and equipment is optional. Encourage attendees who struggle with balance to perform these exercises against a wall or while holding onto a barre.

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Back to Basics: Kickboxing Safety

By | October 18, 2018 |

Kickboxing classes may not be as popular today as they were in the late 1990s, but people still love to hone their skills with this effective cross-training option. Whether you’ve been teaching for several years or you’re just getting started, it’s always a good idea to review the foundational concepts that make up this total-body workout.

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Hot Yoga May Provide Heat Stress Conditioning for Athletes

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | October 11, 2018 |

If you’re looking for a good cross-training technique for your more athletic clients, suggest they practice hot yoga, which may boost aerobic performance while minimizing exercise stress.

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, researchers recruited 10 elite female field hockey players for observation. All athletes participated in 60-minute hot-yoga classes (30 degrees Celsius/86 degrees Fahrenheit) over 6 consecutive days, during which they did not engage in any other exercise. Following the intervention, the athletes played in a national-team camp.

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A Setup for Successful Subbing

By Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA | September 27, 2018 |

If you teach an ongoing group fitness class, inevitably you’ll need a sub. Odds are also strong that you’ll be a substitute at times throughout your teaching career. Whether you are subbing out or subbing in, you want the experience to be the best one possible—for your class, the other instructor and yourself.

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Strength Ladder

By Pamela Light, MA | August 22, 2018 |

Strength training classes don’t have to adhere to a classic “sets and reps” template. Why not climb your way up and down this fun fitness ladder for a fast and furious total-body workout? Repetitions are high, but so is the frequency of change, keeping interest piqued during intense work sets.

Strength Ladder Details
GOAL/EMPHASIS: total-body strength training
TOTAL TIME: 1 hour

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Tennis: Reduce Pain, Improve Performance

By Justin Price, MA | August 15, 2018 |

Tennis is one of the most popular sports in the world. In the U.S. alone, there are almost 18 million players, with another 14 million expressing interest (TIA 2018). Unfortunately, the dynamic, forceful twists and turns of the game pose ever-present injury risks to players (Roetert & Kovacs 2011).
If your fitness clientele includes people interested in playing this sport, you need to understand the causes of tennis-related injuries. This will help you develop strategies to improve movement function, reduce pain and keep clients on the court.

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IDEA Fitness Journal

IDEA Fitness Journal

Current Issue:
December 2019

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