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Cardiovascular Disease

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High-intensity training

Build Up to High-Intensity Training

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | July 13, 2020 |

In light of increased participation in high-intensity training and increased rates of heart attack and sudden cardiac death among male marathon participants, the American Heart Association has issued a scientific statement to outline the benefits and risks of vigorous exercise programs.

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Body Fat and Heart Disease

Strength Training Reduces Heart Fat

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 1, 2020 |

Location matters with body fat. The accumulation of excess fat around the heart can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark assigned participants to resistance training, high-intensity interval endurance training (HIIT) or no exercise. Results showed that only people who lifted weights decreased the fat lying closest to the heart—specifically, inside the sac that encases the heart (the pericardium).

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Exercise and Longevity for Women

Exercise and Longevity for Women

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | March 30, 2020 |

A new study further supports the benefits of maintaining cardiovascular fitness during middle-age and beyond. In a study presented at the European Society of Cardiology’s EuroEcho 2019 meeting in Vienna, high cardiovascular fitness was linked with significantly lower death risks from heart disease, cancer and other causes for middle-aged and older women.

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Physically Active Kids

More Benefits for Fit Kids

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | February 25, 2020 |

Heart health is not simply about having a strong heart muscle; a healthy cardiovascular system requires a healthy nervous system that regulates the heartbeat and supports efficient functioning whether a person is feeling calm or stressed. A new study from Finland shows that more physically active and fit children have better cardiac regulation than those who are less active and less fit.

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