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Steps and Weight Loss

Stepping and Weight Loss

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | June 8, 2020 |

New research shows that, while increasing steps to 4,400 steps per day enhances longevity (and walking more does have numerous health benefits), adding steps without increasing intensity or changing other lifestyle habits may not lead to weight loss.

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High intensity interval walking

Interval Walking in Midlife and Beyond

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 1, 2020 |

For middle-aged and older adults who may not want to run, new research in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings (2019; 94 [12], 2413–26) shows that high-intensity interval walking effectively improves health and fitness. The protocol for this type of walking is 3 minutes at 70% of VO2max followed by 3 minutes at 40% of VO2max, repeated for 5 or more sets.

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Body Fat and Heart Disease

Strength Training Reduces Heart Fat

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 1, 2020 |

Location matters with body fat. The accumulation of excess fat around the heart can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark assigned participants to resistance training, high-intensity interval endurance training (HIIT) or no exercise. Results showed that only people who lifted weights decreased the fat lying closest to the heart—specifically, inside the sac that encases the heart (the pericardium).

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Running program

Any Amount of Running Boosts Health

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | March 30, 2020 |

Get motivated to reboot your clients’ running programs for springtime. The good news: Any amount of running is associated with a 27% lower risk of death from any cause, a 30% lower risk of death from heart disease and a 23% lower risk of death from cancer, according to a study reported in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (2019; doi:10.1136/bjsports-2018-100493). An international team of researchers came to this conclusion after reviewing 14 studies that included more than 232,000 participants.

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Women and Strength Training Factors

Women and Strength Training

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | March 30, 2020 |

Women do not respond to weight training the same way men do. University of New South Wales researchers in Sydney conducted a comprehensive search of the literature on resistance training and found only 24 randomized controlled studies that focused exclusively on women. Lead study author Amanda “Mandy” D. Hagstrom, PhD, lecturer in exercise science at UNSW Medicine, said, “I was surprised. I knew there wouldn’t be many [studies], but I thought there’d be more than that.” The selected studies included almost 1,000 women.

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Training women over 40

Training Loads for Women Over 40

By Amy Ashmore, PhD | March 11, 2020 |

Personal trainers often have female clients over the age of 40 who have similar complaints about losing muscle mass and gaining body fat. Although these changes aren’t unexpected and can be a normal part of the aging process, they are not inevitable. In fact, the right resistance-training program can positively affect body composition by reducing fat, maintaining and building muscle, and increasing strength in this population.

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Hamstring injuries

Preventing Hamstring Injuries

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | February 25, 2020 |

Hamstring injuries are frequent and costly for professional soccer players and important for all active people to avoid. Medical professionals with the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) developed an injury prevention program that blends evidence-based methods and practical considerations. It emphasizes the need for individualized training that targets an athlete’s specific risk factors, based on ongoing screening and monitoring.

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Millennial Health

Poorer Health Among Millennials

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | February 25, 2020 |

Fitness professionals may want to reach out to more young adults, as “millennials are seeing their health decline faster than the previous generation as they age,” reports Blue Cross Blue Shield in The Economic Consequences of Millennial Health, published on November 6, 2019. Millennials were born in 1981–1996 and are considered to be the first generation of “digital natives.”

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IDEA Fitness Journal

IDEA Fitness Journal

Current Issue:
December 2019

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