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Chronic Diseases

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Evening Cardio Training and Hypertension

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | August 20, 2019 |

In another clinical trial examining the impact of time of day on training effects, researchers found that cycling at moderate intensity for 45 minutes three times per week in the evening decreased clinical and ambulatory blood pressure in 50 middle-aged sedentary men with hypertension more than either morning training or stretching (the control group).

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Walking Benefits Older Adults With Arthritis

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | August 20, 2019 |

People with osteoarthritis who walk briskly as little as 1 hour per week can significantly increase their odds of remaining functionally independent. Northwestern University researchers in Chicago examined more than 4 years of data from more than 1,500 adults—age 49 or older—who had arthritis but no disability. Their activity levels varied. Activity data analysis showed that people who did 1 hour of moderate-to-vigorous activity per week had a higher probability of remaining free from disability than those who exercised less.

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Two of a Kind

By Sarah Kolvas | June 24, 2019 |

When Colleen Evans wanted to improve her strength while healing from Lyme disease, her doctor knew exactly who could help her: fellow patient and personal trainer Shona Curley.

Like Colleen, Curley had been diagnosed with Lyme disease and was coping with its symptoms.

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Breast Cancer Survivors and Group Exercise

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | June 14, 2019 |

Research shows that exercise benefits breast cancer survivors, but many do not stick with programs. What might appeal enough to increase adherence? A pilot study found that group exercise designed specifically for people surviving breast cancer resulted in more improvements to quality of life than similar exercise programming led by personal trainers. The study is available in Oncology Nursing Forum (2019; doi:10.1188/19.0NF.185-97).

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Changing Behavior Changes Lives

By Sandy Todd Webster | May 22, 2019 |

In North America—and around the world—people are suffering or dying from the ravages of chronic lifestyle diseases that are mostly preventable. It’s troubling to write those words as a flat statement of fact, especially in an era of such astonishing medical advancements paralleled with a daily firehose of new health research that further pressure-washes what we already know.

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Short, High-Intensity Weight Training and Diabetes Risk

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 21, 2019 |

Preliminary research on high-intensity training benefits may motivate people who prefer short training sessions and are concerned about diabetes risk. University of Glasgow researchers in Scotland found that 15-minute strength training workouts, done three times a week for 6 weeks, dramatically improved insulin sensitivity and boosted muscle size and strength among 10 young, overweight men.

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Can Exercise Prevent Depression?

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 21, 2019 |

Fifteen minutes of vigorous activity or approximately 1 hour of moderate activity (like walking or gardening)—or a combination of light and vigorous physical activity—may significantly reduce risk of major depression, according to a study published in JAMA Psychiatry (2019; doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.4175).

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Obesity and Cancer Risks in Young Adults

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 21, 2019 |

Recent findings reveal a trend toward increased risk for obesity-related cancers among young American adults. The study, published in The Lancet, found significant increases in six of 12 obesity-related cancers in young adults, with even greater rises in successively younger generations. Compared with people born 1945-1954, for example, those born 1980–1989 had double the risk . . . at the same age.

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Yo-Yo Dieting Tied to Heart Problems

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 16, 2019 |

Obesity and consistently elevated blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels have long been linked to a higher risk of heart disease. But what happens when these metabolic risk factors fluctuate over time, as can happen when people flip-flop between diets? The answer may hail from a study in the journal Circulation involving a massive 6.7 million people.

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More Long-Term Aerobic Fitness Benefits

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | April 22, 2019 |

New research adds to growing evidence that current cardiovascular fitness levels affect heart disease risks as far ahead as 9 years in the future. “Even among people who seem to be healthy, the top 25% of the most fit individuals actually have only half as high a risk [of heart disease] as the least fit 25%,” said principal investigator Bjarne Nes, PhD, of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

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Blood Pressure, Diet and Aging

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | April 18, 2019 |

It’s official: The typical Western diet is a major driver of rising blood pressure as we age, not age itself as previously thought, according to research from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health published in JAMA Cardiology. The study revealed that members of the isolated South American Yanomami tribe, with virtually no Western dietary influences, typically have no rise in their blood pressure numbers from age 1 to age 60.

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Metabolism and Strength Training

By Zachary Mang, MS | April 16, 2019 |

Resistance training does much more than build strong muscles and bones. Research in the past few years has confirmed that lifting weights changes human metabolism in ways that improve health and well-being. That’s good news for clients with type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and high cholesterol levels.

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