10 Exercise Myths

Aug 13, 2008

Although some old fitness fictions, such as “no pain, no gain” and “spot reducing” are fading fast, plenty of popular exercise misconceptions still exist. Here are some of the most common exercise myths as well as the not-so-common facts based on current exercise research.

Exercise Myth 1. You Will Burn More Fat If You Exercise Longer at a Lower Intensity. The most important focus in exercise and fat weight control is not the percentage of exercise energy coming from fat but the total energy cost, or how many calories are burned during the activity. The faster you walk, step or run, for example, the more calories you use per minute. However, high-intensity exercise is difficult to sustain if you are just beginning or returning to exercise, so you may not exercise very long at this level. It is safer, and more practical, to start out at a lower intensity and work your way up gradually.

Exercise Myth 2. If You’re Not Going to Work Out Hard and Often, Exercise Is a Waste of Time. This kind of thinking keeps a lot of people from maintaining or even starting an exercise program. Research continues to show that any exercise is better than none. For example, regular walking or gardening for as little as an hour a week has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Exercise Myth 3. Yoga Is a Completely Gentle and Safe Exercise. Yoga is an excellent form of exercise, but some styles are quite rigorous and demanding both physically and mentally. As with any form of exercise, qualified, careful instruction is necessary for a safe, effective workout.

Exercise Myth 4. If You Exercise Long and Hard Enough, You Will Always Get the Results You Want. In reality, genetics plays an important role in how people respond to exercise. Studies have shown a wide variation in how different exercisers respond to the same training program. Your development of strength, speed and endurance may be very different from that of other people you know.

Exercise Myth 5. Exercise Is One Sure Way to Lose All the Weight You Desire. As with all responses to exercise, weight gain or loss is impacted by many factors, including dietary intake and genetics. All individuals will not lose the same amount of weight on the same exercise program. It is possible to be active and overweight. However, although exercise alone cannot guarantee your ideal weight, regular physical activity is one of the most important factors for successful long-term weight management.

Exercise Myth 6. If You Want to Lose Weight, Stay Away From Strength Training Because You Will Bulk Up. Most exercise experts believe that cardiovascular exercise and strength training are both valuable for maintaining a healthy weight. Strength training helps maintain muscle mass and decrease body fat percentage.

Exercise Myth 7. Water Fitness Programs Are Primarily for Older People or Exercisers With Injuries. Recent research has shown that water fitness programs can be highly challenging and effective for both improving fitness and losing weight. Even top athletes integrate water fitness workouts into their training programs.

Exercise Myth 8. The Health and Fitness Benefits of Mind-Body Exercise Like Tai Chi and Yoga Are Questionable. In fact, research showing the benefits of these exercises continues to grow. Tai chi, for example, has been shown to help treat low-back pain and fibromyalgia. Improved flexibility, balance, coordination, posture, strength and stress management are just some of the potential results of mind-body exercise.

Exercise Myth 9. Overweight People Are Unlikely to Benefit Much From Exercise. Studies show that obese people who participate in regular exercise programs have a lower risk of all-cause mortality than sedentary individuals, regardless of weight. Both men and women of all sizes and fitness levels can improve their health with modest increases in activity.

Exercise Myth 10. Home Workouts Are Fine, But Going to a Gym Is the Best Way to Get Fit. Research has shown that some people find it easier to stick to a home-based fitness program. In spite of all the hype on trendy exercise programs and facilities, the “best” program for you is the one you will participate in consistently.

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16 Comments

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  • poshyvette aquino

    I've been hearing a lot of people saying that yoga is an easy way to lose weight. I completely disagree. It's hard and it require flexibility. That's the reason why it's effective. For people who wants to lose weight its better if you weigh your options first check out this video. It's very informative and helped me a lot when I was just starting out youtube.com/watch?v=V92wUegHpsU
    Commented Mar 05, 2013
  • poshyvette aquino

    is it working?
    Commented Mar 05, 2013
  • shawn wilson

    i feel this is nice.
    Commented May 14, 2012
  • John miller

    To do the exercise in right way is very important because to get better effect of the work out. It is very important to do the exercise in right way. Nice post.
    Commented Mar 29, 2012
  • betty bridget kirimi

    i wish this site could be made available to developing countries where myths have blossomed and the attitude quite negative. also more invitation to your fitness activities.
    Commented Dec 13, 2011
  • betty bridget kirimi

    wish this site could be made accessible to developing countries where these myths have blossomed and the attitude quite negative by betty kirimi from kenya
    Commented Dec 13, 2011
  • Jana Sled

    Please explain:The faster you walk, step or run, for example, the more calories you use per minute. I was told and have read in many articles that state it doesn't matter the speed at which you do an activity its the distance. For example to run a 5k verses walk a 5k burns the same or about the same calories. The only difference is who gets finished first. So does speed of exercise really increase the calories burned?
    Commented Jun 14, 2011
  • Chris MacDonald

    A comment from the university of Copenhagen. the work IDEA does is great and the articles and pposts are great. however, how about every time it is written "research has sown", "studies show" or other variations that we ALWAYS have a reference. without references, this can be seen as no more serious than a pop atrticle, even if the facts are correct. would be cool to see references. kind regards, chris.
    Commented Jan 06, 2009
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