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Nutrition

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Cooking shows for kids

Cooking Shows Educate Kids on How to Eat Better

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

Demonstrating how to cook healthier foods was an effective way to teach kids about nutrition, found a study of 125 children, ages 10–12 years, who watched cooking shows in the classroom. For comparison, one group of the children watched video clips of a program showing how to cook healthier foods while another group watched the same show featuring unhealthy foods. Afterwards the children were offered a snack.

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Optimism and Food Choices

That Half-Full Glass Tilts Toward Better Eating

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

A new report in Nutrition Journal reveals that dispositional optimism—expecting that more positive things will happen in the future—may lead to better food choices. At baseline and every 6 months, 19,335 volunteers participating in France’s NutriNet-Santé study completed at least three online 24-hour diet records (2014–2018).

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Nutrition research

Online Nutrition Searches Follow Food Trends

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

It’s rewarding to see that some people are searching reliable sources of nutrition information rather than blindly following the fads and opinions littering the online world. The American Society for Nutrition, which publishes four peer-reviewed journals, released a list of ASN articles that received significant press coverage and sharing on social media (some had well over 1,000 tweets).

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Soy

Is Soy Good for You?

By No Author | March 30, 2020 |

The growing popularity of soy products in U.S. and European diets has raised considerable controversy. While the soy-rich diets of Asia generate documented health benefits, questions persist about the safety of soy in some products.

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Chili peppers and heart health

Chili Peppers for Heart Health?

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

People who are fond of adding hot chili peppers to their stews and sauces may be adding to their heart health. Among 22,811 women and men living in southern Italy, 24.3% regularly ate chili peppers four or more times a week. These peppers are part of the Mediterranean diet.

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Sleep and nutrition

Sleep Well, Eat Well

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | February 25, 2020 |

Poor sleep has been linked to unhealthy eating habits and weight gain. Now a team of American researchers believes it knows why people may gravitate toward calorie-dense junk food when sleep deprived: Blame it on the nose.

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Army and diet

For Would-Be Soldiers, Healthier Diets Pay Off

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | February 25, 2020 |

Active-duty males involved in the U.S. Army Special Forces Assessment and Selection course who had higher Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores—used to assess compliance with the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans—performed better on the demanding Army Physical Fitness Test and were up to 75% more likely to be selected for the elite unit than those with the lowest diet-quality scores, according to a study in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Food and planet health

Healthy Food, Healthy Planet

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | February 25, 2020 |

In an analysis of 19 previous investigations involving millions of people, researchers at the University of Minnesota and Oxford University examined the human-health and environmental impacts of 15 different food groups, including legumes, nuts, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, red meat, dairy, eggs, fish and sugar-sweetened beverages. The foods were compared with one another based on how they influence the risk of disease and the toll they take on the planet in terms of water and land use, water and soil pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions.

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Plant-Based Foods Curb Chronic Disease

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | February 25, 2020 |

Here’s another good reason to embrace the trend of eating more plants: A cohort study in Nature Communications involving 56,048 adults in Denmark found that people who over a 23-year period habitually consumed moderate to high amounts of foods rich in flavonoids—naturally occurring chemical compounds found predominantly in plant-based foods—were less likely to die from cancer or heart disease.

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IDEA Fitness Journal

IDEA Fitness Journal

Current Issue:
December 2019

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