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Banned soda and weight control

Banned Sodas = Less Consumption and Slimmer Waistlines

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Ten months after the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of soda and other sugar-sweetened drinks, 214 full-time employees who had frequently consumed these beverages were drinking only about half as much of them, on average, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. The research also showed a drop in waist circumference among the employees.

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Food app for kids

An App to Help Kids Eat Better

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Weight Watchers, now rebranded as WW®, recently launched Kurbo, a new weight-loss app aimed at ages 8–17. Among the weight- and diet-focused elements of the Kurbo app is a traffic-light system that indicates which foods kids can freely enjoy and which they should limit. For example, an apple gets a green light, and soda gets a red light.

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Bitter vegetables

Vegetables: A Bitter Pill to Swallow

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Loathe eating certain vegetables? It could come down to your genes, say scientists at the University of Kentucky School of Medicine. According to their research, presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 in Philadelphia, people who inherit two copies of a certain variant of the taste gene TAS2R38 are so-called “super-tasters” and perceive vegetables like broccoli and cabbage to be oh-so-bitter.

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MSG in food

Use Less Salt, Keep the Flavor

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Starting in the 1960s, monosodium glutamate was demonized for causing headaches, flushing and other symptoms lumped into “Chinese restaurant syndrome.” However, current consensus among researchers and the Food and Drug Administration is that anti-MSG sentiments are largely unfounded and that the glutamate-containing flavor enhancer is generally safe to eat in reasonable amounts.

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Microplastics in tea

There’s Trouble Brewing with Microplastics in Tea

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

In recent years, plenty of research has shown that a daily tea habit can have some steep health benefits. But if you dunk tea bags in steamy water, you may be drinking microplastics with your brew, say researchers at Quebec’s McGill University. They found that steeping tea bags made with plastic (yes, surprise, many bags are made from plastics like polyethylene terephthalate) at a brewing temperature of 203 degrees Fahrenheit released 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 billion nanoplastics into a single cup of tea.

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Whole grains

Good News for Whole Grains

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

The average American Heart Association healthy-diet score for U.S. adults improved between 2003–2004 and 2015–2016, according to the AHA Statistical Update 2020. Two scales were used to measure diet quality. On one of them, scores for a poor diet decreased from 56% to 47.8%; on the second, poor diet prevalence dropped from 43.7% to 36.4%.

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Lifestyle and Longevity

Lifestyle and Longevity Go Hand in Hand

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

When it’s likely that you are going to live into your 80s and 90s, isn’t it a good idea to work toward a healthy life span? Five lifestyle choices—the ones fitness professionals regularly recommend—may help you do it, according to a new analysis published online in the BMJ.
In this prospective cohort study, 73,196 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (34 years of data) and 38,366 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (28 years of data) reported their adherence to the Alternate Healthy Eating Index; how often they engaged in moderate-to-vigorous exercise for at least 30 minutes per day; whether they maintained a body mass index of 18.5–24.9 kg/m2; whether their alcohol intake was moderate (up to one serving per day for women and up to two for men); and whether they smoked.

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Smart Snacks Program

Fresh Food and Vegetables Appear in Schools

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

Back in 2013, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released the Smart Snacks in School standards, which aimed to reduce fat and sugar in students’ diets by encouraging schools to provide healthier snacking choices like whole grains, low-fat dairy, fruits, vegetables and leaner protein. The standards were put in place after research indicated that schools which offered foods and beverages containing solid fats and added sugars were helping to add “empty calories” to youngsters’ diets. Consuming empty calories can increase overall energy intake, leading to overweight and other health conditions.

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Mediterranean diet

The Med Diet Stands the Test of Time

By Patricia Ryan, MS | March 30, 2020 |

Among 250 healthy, overweight adults participating in a randomized controlled study, more than half (55%) went for IF (restricting intake 2 days a week), while 27% chose the Mediterranean diet (emphasizing whole grains, fruit and vegetables), and 18% opted to go Paleo (modified to allow some legumes and dairy). Participants also chose whether to try high-intensity interval training or a standard exercise regimen. After a brief educational session on their chosen diet, they completed assessments of their food intake, biometric measures and physical activity; these assessments were repeated at intervals.

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IDEA Fitness Journal

IDEA Fitness Journal

Current Issue:
December 2019

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