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Nutrition

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Banned soda and weight control

Banned Sodas = Less Consumption and Slimmer Waistlines

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Ten months after the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of soda and other sugar-sweetened drinks, 214 full-time employees who had frequently consumed these beverages were drinking only about half as much of them, on average, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. The research also showed a drop in waist circumference among the employees.

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Food app for kids

An App to Help Kids Eat Better

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Weight Watchers, now rebranded as WW®, recently launched Kurbo, a new weight-loss app aimed at ages 8–17. Among the weight- and diet-focused elements of the Kurbo app is a traffic-light system that indicates which foods kids can freely enjoy and which they should limit. For example, an apple gets a green light, and soda gets a red light.

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Bitter vegetables

Vegetables: A Bitter Pill to Swallow

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Loathe eating certain vegetables? It could come down to your genes, say scientists at the University of Kentucky School of Medicine. According to their research, presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 in Philadelphia, people who inherit two copies of a certain variant of the taste gene TAS2R38 are so-called “super-tasters” and perceive vegetables like broccoli and cabbage to be oh-so-bitter.

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MSG in food

Use Less Salt, Keep the Flavor

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

Starting in the 1960s, monosodium glutamate was demonized for causing headaches, flushing and other symptoms lumped into “Chinese restaurant syndrome.” However, current consensus among researchers and the Food and Drug Administration is that anti-MSG sentiments are largely unfounded and that the glutamate-containing flavor enhancer is generally safe to eat in reasonable amounts.

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Microplastics in tea

There’s Trouble Brewing with Microplastics in Tea

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | May 1, 2020 |

In recent years, plenty of research has shown that a daily tea habit can have some steep health benefits. But if you dunk tea bags in steamy water, you may be drinking microplastics with your brew, say researchers at Quebec’s McGill University. They found that steeping tea bags made with plastic (yes, surprise, many bags are made from plastics like polyethylene terephthalate) at a brewing temperature of 203 degrees Fahrenheit released 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 billion nanoplastics into a single cup of tea.

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IDEA Fitness Journal

IDEA Fitness Journal

Current Issue:
December 2019

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