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Strength/Resistance

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Resistance training older adults

Resistance Training for Older Adults: New NSCA Position Stand

By Len Kravitz, PhD | December 18, 2019 |

Fitness professionals know that resistance exercises are pivotal for maintaining and increasing muscle strength and mass as well as thwarting the negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle, particularly as we age. The National Strength and Conditioning Association recently addressed these issues in the organization’s first position stand on resistance training for older adults (ages 65 and older).

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Sample Class: Seated Exercises for Older Adults

By | October 21, 2019 |

Older adults are more susceptible to deficits in cardiovascular fitness, muscle mass, strength and power, which may ultimately lead to losses in physical function. The following chair-based format focuses on improving outcomes for older participants, especially those who may need the support of a chair during exercise. Ready, Set, Sit! offers the variety of three 15-minute training segments (cardiovascular, high intensity and strength/power), while targeting important components that boost overall function.

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Muscular Strength and Mental Well-Being

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | October 15, 2019 |

In a study of midlife women in Singapore, weak upper- and lower-body strength was associated with depression and anxiety. Researchers analyzed data from 1,159 healthy women ages 45–69 for physical activity, physical performance, lifestyle choices, reproductive health, sociodemographic characteristics, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Weak handgrip strength and poor lower-body strength were associated with elevated symptoms of depression and/or anxiety. Fifteen percent of participants reported depression and/or anxiety.

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High-Volume, High-Intensity Exercise Is Safe for Men

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | October 15, 2019 |

No need for concern about increased death risk from heart disease among experienced middle-aged exercisers who engage in high-intensity activity, at least if they’re male. Findings from a 10-year study of 21,758 generally healthy, very active men—like marathon runners, cyclists and swimmers—showed that even for those with higher coronary-artery calcium levels, athletic pursuits did not elevate risk of death.

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Men’s Health Research Review

By IDEA Authors | September 24, 2019 |

Men: Are you exercising and eating healthfully but not losing the weight you want? The good news is that there are more benefits to these two habits than just weight loss.

Megan Senger, professional fitness writer/editor and fitness instructor based in North Carolina, has summarized a few studies that center on men’s wellness, with comments on what the findings may mean for you.

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Sample Class: Excellent EMOM

By Melissa Weigelt | August 21, 2019 |

If you enjoy teaching (and doing) high-intensity classes, this workout is for you! The “every minute on the minute” (EMOM) protocol is fun, fast-moving and challenging. You start a predetermined number of reps at the top of a minute and rest for the time you have left until the next minute begins. Class participants will enjoy the flexibility of going at their own pace while also being incentivized to work steadily throughout the experience.

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Women Need Protein, Too

By Matthew Kadey, MS, RD | August 20, 2019 |

For years we’ve heard that people who regularly lift weights can benefit from eating higher amounts of protein than the general population. There’s just one glaring problem. Most of the research behind this advice was conducted on men, with little focus on women. Now, a study in the April 2019 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise has shed light on the specific protein needs of this understudied demographic.

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Self-Selected or Fixed-Duration Rep Speed

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | August 20, 2019 |

A small study addressed the question of whether one gets better results from performing resistance training reps at a self-selected pace or at a fixed rep duration (2-second concentric phase, 2-second eccentric phase). Researchers from universities in S?úo Paolo recruited 12 resistance-trained men and evaluated exercise volume, muscle activation and time under tension.

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Location Affects Fitness Activity Choice

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | June 14, 2019 |

While group fitness is most popular in Salt Lake City, Los Angeles and New York City, using weights or resistance machines is most widespread in San Diego, Chicago, and the Cleveland, Akron and Canton areas of Ohio.

Virtual-based training—either streamed live or recorded in advance—is growing in popularity. The most prevalent home-based activities include body-weight exercise, Pilates, stretching, tai chi and yoga.

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Short, High-Intensity Weight Training and Diabetes Risk

By Shirley Archer, JD, MA | May 21, 2019 |

Preliminary research on high-intensity training benefits may motivate people who prefer short training sessions and are concerned about diabetes risk. University of Glasgow researchers in Scotland found that 15-minute strength training workouts, done three times a week for 6 weeks, dramatically improved insulin sensitivity and boosted muscle size and strength among 10 young, overweight men.

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IDEA Fitness Journal

IDEA Fitness Journal

Current Issue:
December 2019

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