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Chronic Diseases

Chronic Pain in Fitness Professionals

By Alexandra Williams, MA | July 2, 2015 |

An Objective Eye

It can be difficult to take a step back and be objective when it comes to your own health. Katy Bowman, MS, director of the Restorative Exercise Institute in Ventura, California, and author
of Move Your DNA: Restore Your Health Through Natural Movement (Propriometrics Press 2014), suggests you write down
the following:

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Profiles of Pain and Perseverance

By Ryan Halvorson | June 19, 2015 |

In February 2006, Danny Strong was on top of the world. After years of working as a gym manager, he had opened his own personal training gym, making his dream a reality. The husband and father was also eager to welcome a second child into the family. A month after receiving the keys to his new facility, he took his family on a trip to visit his godmother. While on the road, Strong lost control of his vehicle and was hit by a tractor-trailer traveling at full speed. His pregnant wife, Sandra Urbano Strong, was killed instantly.

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Physical Activity in Middle Age Reduces Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk

By Ryan Halvorson | June 17, 2015 |

Need more help motivating your clients to stay active?

Scientists recently analyzed 1,247 sudden cardiac
arrest (SCA) cases to learn more about links between SCA events and sports participation. Study subjects were aged 35–65. Providing a boon to the active set, the researchers reported that only 5% of sudden cardiac arrests occurred during sports activities. Prevalence was higher in men and among those around 51 years of age. SCA survival rates were higher among active individuals than among those whose cardiac arrests were not sport related.

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Four Heart Disease Facts

By Kevin N. Do | June 4, 2015 |

Developing a thorough understanding of coronary artery disease (CAD) can help fitness professionals fight one of the world’s deadliest diseases. ?

How deadly? For starters, CAD is the leading cause of death around the world, accounting for 13.2% of all deaths in 2012 (WHO 2014a). It kills almost 380,000 Americans every year (CDC 2014a). Exercise professionals can do something about these statistics by designing fitness programs that reduce CAD risk factors in clients while improving their quality of life. ?

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Safe Stabilization

By Janet Weller, RN | May 14, 2015 |

Exercise guidelines call for people with osteoporosis to avoid flexing or twisting the spine (National Osteoporosis Foundation 2015). This makes training the core a little more challenging. Planks (side and prone) and bridges are both great options, but they can get boring. The exercises below safely target the core without spinal flexion or twisting.

Ball Warding

Stand sideways to wall, hands centered on stability ball. Arms are straight, at shoulder level. Press hands into ball, and tap each foot back (alternate).

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Tips for Working With Older Caregivers

By Alexandra Williams, MA | May 7, 2015 |

Adults over 50 who are caring for aging parents are not like other fitness clients of similar age.

For starters, caregivers tend to be less healthy. A study by the insurance company MetLife noted that “adult children 50+ who work and provide care to a parent are more likely to have fair or poor health than those who do not provide care to their parents” (MetLife 2011). Another study showed that 17% of caregivers felt their health had gotten worse as a result of their caregiving responsibilities (Feinberg et al. 2011).

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Self Myofascial Release for Seniors

By IDEA Authors | April 20, 2015 |

Did you know it’s important to take care of the fascia—or connective tissue—in your body? The health of connective tissue is a serious concern for older people, as movement restrictions can make it hard for them to perform simple activities of daily living. The condition of our connective tissue depends on two factors—how old we are and what we have done in our lives to keep our tissue healthy, hydrated and flexible.

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The Best Time of Day to Exercise for Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes

By Ryan Halvorson | April 20, 2015 |

Do you have clients with type 2 diabetes? Perhaps you should think carefully about when to schedule their strength training sessions, say researchers.

The purpose of their study was to determine whether pre- or post-dinner resistance exercise (RE) would more effectively reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in individuals with type
2 diabetes. The researchers noted that this group tends to have “abnormally” elevated postprandial glucose and triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations, which are known risk factors for CVD.

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Activity Requirements for Adults With Limited Mobility

By Ryan Halvorson | April 19, 2015 |

While much of the population is physically able to meet the accepted exercise recommendations for improving health, many people are not. Research from the University Institute on Aging, at the University of Florida, Gainesville, indicates that even modest amounts of activity can prove beneficial for those with physical limitations.

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Postmenopausal Women: Jump for Bone Health

By Ryan Halvorson | April 19, 2015 |

Knee osteoarthritis (OA)—a progressive disease that destroys articular tissues and cartilage—affects about 13% of women aged 60 and older. According to a report published in the Caspian Journal of Internal Medicine (2011; 2 [2], 205–12), the percentage of the overall population affected by OA is expected to increase owing to the growth of the older-adult segment and to high overweight and obesity rates. However, this study shows there may a solution for women with mild knee OA: progressive-impact exercise.

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Powerful Postures to Melt Stress

By Lawrence Biscontini, MA | April 19, 2015 |

In today’s complicated world, just listening to the evening news on television or radio can raise cortisol rates in the body. High stress levels, combined with current technological advancements, almost unending sensorial bombardment, and the ever-changing dietary habits of many developed countries, can deny the body time for repose and resynthesis.

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Understanding Inflammation

By Len Kravitz, PhD | April 9, 2015 |

Inflammation is the body’s immune, self-protective and healing response to harmful stimuli, irritants, pathogens and damaged cells. Most inflammation is acute, such as when you sprain your ankle. Symptoms of inflammation include swelling, redness, pain and (sometimes) impaired movement or function.

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Playing Hurt

By Alexandra Williams, MA | March 16, 2015 |

When Gray Cook was a high-school athlete, his coaches would comment, “That Gray Cook sure can play hurt.” He had over 20 fractures before he was 18, what with his love of football and motorcycles. He played while hurt, he says, because he had the ability to block out pain. Flash forward to 2014, and Cook—now a practicing physical therapist, certified orthopedic specialist and founder of Functional Movement Systems in Chatham, Virginia—was no longer able to block out neck pain. It was affecting his life, his work, and his ability to share his message of fitness and health.

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Coronary Artery Disease: What Every Fitness Professional Needs to Know

By Kevin N. Do | March 16, 2015 |

Developing a thorough understanding of coronary artery disease (CAD) can help fitness professionals fight one of the world’s deadliest diseases. ?

How deadly? For starters, CAD is the leading cause of death around the world, accounting for 13.2% of all deaths in 2012 (WHO 2014a). It kills almost 380,000 Americans every year (CDC 2014a). Exercise professionals can do something about these statistics by designing fitness programs that reduce CAD risk factors in clients while improving their quality of life. ?

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Is Magnesium a Diabetes Healer?

By Sandy Todd Webster | March 16, 2015 |

A Tufts University study led by Adela Hruby, PhD, MPH, has found that healthy people with the highest magnesium intake were 37% less likely to develop high blood sugar or excess circulating insulin, common precursors to diabetes.

Among people who already had those conditions, those who consumed the most magnesium were 32% less likely to develop diabetes than those consuming the least.

The second association held true even when researchers accounted
for other healthful factors—such as fiber—that often go along with magnesium-rich foods.

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Fall Prevention Training for Seniors

By Ryan Halvorson | March 15, 2015 |

It appears there is a growing need for seniors to engage in fall prevention. A recent report found a significant increase in falls from 1998 to 2010.

Researchers looked at data from the Health and Retirement Study, which is an interview-based report. Among individuals aged 65 and older, the percentage who had experienced at least one fall in the 2 years prior to the interview rose from 28.2% to 36.3%—a relative increase of close to 30%. The researchers were surprised to learn that the increase was most marked among the younger people studied (those closer to 65).

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