Movement Menu

Use a variety of playful options to reinvigorate your participants.

By Joy Keller
Dec 31, 2006

Les Mills International has added BODYVIVE to its range of group fitness programs. Geared for Baby Boomers, BODYVIVE is a low-impact, 55-minute class that incorporates cardiovascular activity, strength, stability, stretching and mobility work. Sessions incorporate balls and bands to exercise the body in different ways and with various intensities.

ZENnis integrates the breathing and relaxation of yoga with the movements and rhythm of tennis. A typical routine includes 20 minutes of yoga, 30 minutes of tennis drills and 10 minutes of relaxation. Creator Betsy Wise draws parallels between the two activities on her website: “In our yoga practice, we lengthen and twist the spine, which is excellent preparation for the torquing motion required in tennis. In yoga, we lengthen the muscles, which is excellent for the agility and quickness required in tennis. In both yoga and tennis, breathing is essential to achieve balance, rhythm and focus.”

Equinox Santa Monica members who want additional intensity opt for Doubleshot. IDEA members Desirée Bartlett and Amy Dixon offer “two shots of high-intensity, heart-pumping athletic movement.” The class blends plyometric training, strength training and cardiovascular work with athletic-style power yoga.

IDEA member Connie Morrill teaches Power Fusion at John Garey Pilates Studio in Long Beach, California. The class uses stability balls, BOSU® Balance Trainers and free weights and works on core, balance, strength and focus issues.

The STOTT Pilates® Pilates Circuit Training class makes use in 1 hour of
almost every piece of Pilates equipment available. While the concept encourages creative variety, in order to stay true to Pilates principles, STOTT recommends that instructors be thoroughly trained before leading a class.

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Joy Keller

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