fbpx Skip to content

ADVERTISEMENT

Program Trends

The Best Exercise for Alzheimer’s Disease

By Ryan Halvorson | April 13, 2018 |

If you were asked to choose among cardiovascular exercise, resistance training and a combination of both to help people with Alzheimer’s disease, what choice would you make?
Researchers from the University of Connecticut wanted to understand the effects of exercise—if any—on cognitive decline in those at risk of or diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The scientists performed a meta-analysis of 19 studies (23 exercise interventions) featuring 1,145 adults aged 77 ± 7.5 years.

Read More

Creative Ideas That Inspire

By Lisa Quigley | April 4, 2018 |

KONGA®, at Funk & Twist Fitness in Basingstoke, England, is a high-intensity offering that incorporates elements of boxing, cardio, dance and sculpt. The program vibe is fierce and wild, and sessions are set to upbeat music designed to inspire and motivate. The class is updated each month with fresh choreography so that participants don’t become bored or hit fitness plateaus. It’s appropriate for all levels, from beginners to seasoned fitness enthusiasts.

Read More

May I Have This Dance?

By Ryan Halvorson | March 21, 2018 |

client: Bert | personal trainer: Ann Heizer | location: Oceanside, California

Doctor’s orders. “Thanks for coming into my life and helping me deal with Parkinson’s disease,” says Bert, warmly sharing his respect for his trainer, Ann Heizer. “Working out with you has helped me stay positive and flexible.”

Read More

Primed to Squat

By Lynne Skilton-Hayes | March 21, 2018 |

Why is it that so few people can squat correctly, yet my 8-year-old son squats perfectly? I’ve never taught him how to squat; he innately learned how, just as he learned to roll over, crawl, pull himself up and eventually walk. He simply needed the freedom to allow his body to move. Movement before strength is key.

Read More

Special Benefits of Group Exercise

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | March 20, 2018 |

Group fitness instructors may also want to approach medical schools with an offer to provide exercise classes for medical students. To support a pitch, refer to a recent nonrandomized controlled study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association; it found that, for medical students, group exercise can reduce stress and improve physical, mental and emotional quality of life more than training alone or not engaging in any exercise program.

Read More

Fitter Kids Have More Brain Gray Matter

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | March 19, 2018 |

While much research has pointed to a relationship between kids’ fitness and academic performance, we now have a new piece of the puzzle: A recent study found that aerobic fitness and speed–agility levels among overweight and obese children aged 8–11 were independently associated with more gray matter in parts of the brain related to better academic performance.

Read More

Firefighter Fitness Status

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | March 19, 2018 |

A health promotion opportunity for fitness professionals may lie in working with local firefighters. A longitudinal study of fitness-­level changes among firefighters found that while they significantly improve health and fitness measures during firefighter training, many lose a lot of those gains as active-duty firefighters. Physical training is no longer mandatory once firefighters have completed their academy education.

Read More

Question of the Month

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | March 19, 2018 |

With springtime’s seasonal change and momentum for renewal, are you or your facility offering any new spring training programs to build participation or recruit new clients? If so, please describe the program you’re promoting, your target demographic, and whether it’s indoors or outside. Also, let us know how it is received.

Share your responses with executive editor Joy Keller, [email protected]

Read More

Smoking and Musculoskeletal Injury Risk

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | March 19, 2018 |

Researchers have identified more reasons to quit smoking and to alert any clients who do smoke. A recent research review on smoking and musculoskeletal injury risk in military trainees found that for those who smoked, injury risk was 31% higher for men and 23% higher for women. The risk grew as smoking levels increased. For example, among the heaviest smokers, risk increased up to 84% for men and up to 56% for women.

Read More

4,000 Steps a Day for Brain Fitness

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | March 19, 2018 |

By walking more than 4,000 steps a day, adults aged 60 and older can improve both attention and mental skills, according to a study in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (2017; doi:10.3233/JAD-170586).
University of California, Los Angeles, researchers examined the relationship between physical activity and cognitive function in nondemented older adults with memory issues. For 2 years, researchers tracked the number of daily steps taken by 26 older adults and conducted neuropsychological tests and MRI scans to measure thickness of brain ­structures.

Read More

Shoulder Blades: The Right Moves

By Erin Lyons | March 16, 2018 |

The shoulder blades, or scapulae, are critical links in the kinetic chain from the waist through the shoulders, up to the neck and down to the fingertips. Abnormalities in the position or movement of the shoulder blades—technically called scapular dyskinesis—can trigger pain and discomfort, especially among people who spend long hours sitting and using computers.

Read More

Programming to Prevent ACL Injury

By Catherine Logan, MD | March 16, 2018 |

Your new client, 16-year-old Alexis, is a competitive athlete who wants you to design a fitness program that will help her prevent a second anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. She partially tore her ACL while playing soccer and rehabbed it with a physical therapist, who cleared her to play again. Alexis returned to spring softball without an issue, but she would like to be as fully prepared as possible for the upcoming fall soccer season. She hopes to be recruited to play in college, but her parents are concerned she will sustain another ACL injury, perhaps a more severe one.

Read More

Get a more inspired inbox

Unlock the latest industry research, tools and exclusive offers.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT