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COVID-19 (Coronavirus): Updated information and resources from IDEA

Natalie Digate Muth, MD, MPH, RD

Natalie Digate Muth, MD, MPH, RD

Natalie Digate Muth, MD, MPH, RD, is a registered dietitian and a recent graduate of the UNC School of Medicine. She has made several appearances as a nutrition expert on CW&#39s San Diego 6, been quoted as a fitness expert in the New York Times, and is an ACE master trainer and award-winning author. She is currently pursuing a residency in pediatrics. Certifications: ACE, ACSM and NSCA

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Article Archive

Eat Eggs, Build Muscle

March 15, 2018

Eggs belong on the shortlist of superfoods. Costing just about 15 cents each for some brands, they are loaded with high-quality protein and many other nutrients. For athletes, especially those involved in resistance training, egg protein is particularly valuable for increasing muscle protein synthesis.

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MyPlate Goes Seasonal

March 15, 2018

Looking for new nutrition tools and resources to share with clients? MyPlate has launched seasonal resources for nutrition and health professionals to share with clients. Jump into spring with gardening resources and ideas for using homegrown herbs in cooking, and sample Earth Day activities, farmers’ market resources, and tips for prepping potlucks and parties.
Learn more at choosemyplate.gov/seasonal.

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Female Athletes May Need to Pump Up the Protein

March 15, 2018

Female team athletes may need more protein for optimal recovery than previous research has suggested, according to a new study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the American College of Sports Medicine’s flagship journal. This study looked at six women engaging in variable-intensity intermittent exercise, the activity style common to most team sports.

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Trending: The Vacuum-Insulated Water Bottle

March 15, 2018

Next time you’re playing a game, hiking, working out at the gym or going for a walk, think about vacuum-insulated water bottles. They can boost hydration by keeping water cold and refreshing for up to 24 hours, and they’ll keep hot drinks hot for up to 5–6 hours. The bottles work this magic by including two chambers: a water compartment and surrounding vacuum-channel insulation. Meeting requirements for style, function and eco-friendliness, these vacuum-insulated water bottles offer a fun, effective way to hydrate.

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Spotting the Food Industry’s Influence on Nutrition Research

March 15, 2018

The food industry has an inherent conflict of interest when it funds
nutrition research. After all, food manufacturers’ livelihoods rise and fall on how we decide to consume calories. The industry’s deep pockets translate into influence over dietary experts, scientific studies and nutrition policymakers.

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Healthy-Eating Blogs

March 15, 2018

Thinking of starting a nutrition
or healthy-eating blog? Start by
knowing the data on what end users find most useful.
To understand what people
are looking for, researchers asked
33 women for their perceptions of
four Canadian healthy-eating blogs. The results were published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Understanding Set-Point Weight

February 12, 2018

Humans are hardwired to resist dietary restrictions. Science bears this out: In the absence of an ongoing weight maintenance program, half of the people who lose 10% or more of body weight gain it all back within 5 years or so (Montesi et al. 2016).

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Cooking Hack—Not Your Mother’s Pressure Cooker

December 13, 2017

If you’re anything like one of our editors, who has vivid memories of tomato sauce dripping from the kitchen ceiling after her mom’s 1970s pressure cooker exploded, you might be a little fearful of jumping on the pressure cooker bandwagon. But chances are good that, if you do, you won’t regret it (don’t worry—pressure cookers these days have safety valves to help prevent explosions). These kitchen contraptions are making a comeback due to their unmatched power to put a delicious dinner on the table in no time. Pressure cookers work by heating up food rapidly in a sealed pot.

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Dietary Guidelines for Americans—What’s to Come?

December 13, 2017

Every 5 years, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture update the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. A scientific advisory committee is recruited and installed in the 2 years before the DGA are released. This committee reviews the nutrition literature and provides nonbinding recommendations to the federal government. The committee’s report is posted publicly and is open to public comment.

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Gluten-Free for Life?

December 13, 2017

The gluten-free movement leaves researchers, clinicians and nutrition professionals with many unanswered questions, especially how to best help those who do not have celiac disease—an autoimmune ailment linking gluten to severe intestinal damage—but experience similar symptoms.

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Join the Culinary Movement

December 13, 2017

The best method for helping someone make healthier nutrition choices goes beyond providing nutrition education and reciting key points from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. It includes helping people develop the skills needed to translate information into real life—that is, living the DGA.

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Health Coaches and Fit Pros Can Broaden Reach in Clinical Practice

December 12, 2017

Authors of a recent viewpoint published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association issued a call for clinicians to incorporate more nutrition counseling into their patient interactions to better help people improve health outcomes. The authors noted that our changing healthcare system offers clinicians more opportunities to engage patients in nutrition counseling, though few do.

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Can an AI App Help Us Eat Better? FitGenie Wants to Try

December 12, 2017

Because self-monitoring of dietary intake is critical to achieving weight and nutrition goals, demand is high for easy-to-use apps that make food tracking easier, help users interpret the results, and use data to set goals and develop meal plans. FitGenie is an innovative app that uses artificial intelligence to give people their own “nutritionist” that tailors meal plans and recommendations based on individual factors, according to the popular technology blog TechCrunch. And more apps are likely to follow.

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Life Hack for Tastier, Easier Meals: Sous Vide Cooking

August 23, 2017

Want to experience the tender deliciousness of a cut of meat or fish from a high-end restaurant without leaving your home or laboring in the kitchen for hours? If so, sous vide (pronounced sue-veed) cooking is right for you. For anywhere from under $100 to $300 for the sous vide precision cooker, plus a few dollars for plastic freezer bags and food cost, you can have a gourmet meal on the table in a couple of hours, with mere minutes spent in preparation.

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What Is a Lectin-Free Diet

August 23, 2017

As the gluten-free diet fad winds down, a “lectin-free” diet may become the next big trend. Fueling interest is a new book called The Plant Paradox by Steven R. Gundry (Harper Wave 2017), which claims that lectins in whole grains, legumes, nightshade vegetables (tomato, pepper, eggplant, potatoes), fruit, dairy and eggs are the enemy of anyone trying to lose weight and/or optimize health, according to a report on the Food Insight website.

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Kids Bombarded With Junk Food Ads

August 23, 2017

More than 75% of food-related television ads that kids see promote high-calorie, unhealthy foods and drinks, according to a UConn Rudd Center study published in June. While exposure to such ads has generally declined since a 2007 self-regulation initiative aimed at reducing advertising of unhealthy food targeting kids, children are still seeing many more ads for candy, sugary drinks and fast-food restaurants than they are for healthy foods. This study looked only at television advertising.

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