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COVID-19 (Coronavirus): Updated information and resources from IDEA

Natalie Digate Muth, MD, MPH, RD

Natalie Digate Muth, MD, MPH, RD

Natalie Digate Muth, MD, MPH, RD, is a registered dietitian and a recent graduate of the UNC School of Medicine. She has made several appearances as a nutrition expert on CW&#39s San Diego 6, been quoted as a fitness expert in the New York Times, and is an ACE master trainer and award-winning author. She is currently pursuing a residency in pediatrics. Certifications: ACE, ACSM and NSCA

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Article Archive

Some Home-Delivered Kits May Not Be Safe to Eat

August 23, 2017

The popularity of home-delivery meal kits is on the rise, at least in part because of a hot startup economy and increasing consumer interest in cooking and eating food at home (though many still lack the time or know-how to do it).

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Just to Be Clear, Saturated Fat Is Not Good for Heart Health

August 23, 2017

A presidential advisory from the American Heart Association released in June concluded strongly that lowering intake of saturated fat and replacing it with unsaturated fats—especially polyunsaturated ones—reduces cardiovascular disease rates. Studies indicate that this change would lower CVD rates by 30%, similar to the drop achieved by ubiquitous statin medications. Replacing saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats lowers levels of “bad” low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Fat composition of commonly used oils is shown in the chart.

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Juices Lack Many Benefits of Whole Fruit

August 23, 2017

Everybody should eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables, which are rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals—nutrients associated with improved health and longevity. And it’s tempting to believe these benefits extend to 100% fruit juice.

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From Drab to Fab: Giving Veggies Snazzy Names Increases Consumption in Adults

August 23, 2017

Vegetable consumption is notoriously low: Just 13% of adults and about 5% of children eat the recommended servings of vegetables per day. Studies have pointed to one way to get kids to eat more veggies: giving vegetables cool names like “x-ray vision carrots” and “power punch broccoli.” A study published by JAMA Internal Medicine in June found that the tactic was equally effective in adults when vegetables were given “indulgent” descriptions such as “dynamite chili and tangy lime-seasoned beets” or “sweet sizzlin’ green beans and crispy shallots.”

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Fruit and Vegetable Prescription Success

August 23, 2017

A small 10-week pilot study found that patients who received a fruit and vegetable “prescription” along with $30 tokens per week to spend on fruits and vegetables at a local farmer’s market reduced weight, waist circumference and cholesterol levels compared with a control group given a $30 gas card per week, reports the Cape Cod Times.

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Can Cinnamon Fight the Epidemic of Prediabetes?

August 23, 2017

With rates of prediabetes and diabetes climbing, there is great interest in inexpensive interventions that can help to control blood sugar levels. Studies suggest that people who consume 1 g of cinnamon (just under ½ teaspoon) per day have a blood sugar reduction in line with the decrease from prescription drugs, Time magazine reported in April. How
cinnamon exerts these effects is an area of active investigation. Add cinnamon to oatmeal, yogurt, tea and applesauce to boost intake.

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New Study Shows Alternate-Day Fast and Calorie Restriction Equally Effective at Weight Loss

August 23, 2017

People striving to lose weight have long been wooed by diet trends, hoping a new discovery or novel program will be their path to achieving a goal weight. Usually, research into the effectiveness of these diets lags behind media attention and public interest.
True to form, that has been the case with the alternate-day fast, a popular diet trend
that features a day of fasting for each day of eat-whatever-you-want “feasting.”

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Fueled to Perform

August 17, 2017

In the much-hyped Breaking2 event last spring, Nike®-sponsored elite marathoners tried to run the fastest-ever marathon, breaking the 2-hour threshold. Achieving such a feat—a 4:34-per-mile pace for 26.2 miles—would require extraordinary speed and stamina and exquisite attention to fueling and nutrition. Ultimately, Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge finished the Nike event in 2:00:25, a sliver short of his goal but still in record time—at a 4:36 pace!

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Question of the Month

April 17, 2017

Parents seem to realize their kids need to eat better—but they're not doing much about it.
A recent national poll of 1,767 parents of kids aged 4–18, conducted by C.S. Mott Children"s Hospital at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, found that while 97% of the grownups believed childhood eating habits have a lifelong impact on health, only 1 in 6 of them felt that their child's diet was very healthy.

Send your responses to Sandy Todd Webster at [email protected]

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Update to Labels May Curb Food Waste

April 17, 2017

Americans waste about 8 million pounds of food each year. What if we could easily reduce that—and put nearly $30 million back into people's pockets? Ditching expiration‐date labels on foods offers a promising start.

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What Is Milk, Anyway?

April 17, 2017

Plant‐based milks such as almond milk, soymilk, coconut milk, hemp milk and others seem to have wounded the pride of traditional milk providers. In January, a bill called the Dairy Pride Act was introduced in Congress. If passed, it would compel the Food and Drug Administration to enforce an existing guideline that limits use of the word "milk" to the products of hooved mammals like cows, sheep and goats.

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Yes, Magnesium Deserves More Respect

April 17, 2017

People tend to forget about magnesium, but health experts increasingly recognize the key role it plays in boosting health. Magnesium is critical to muscle, nerve and heart function; blood glucose control; energy production; and bone structure.

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Don’t Go Sour on Fermented Foods

April 17, 2017

Looking for novel, nutrient‐packed foods to add to your diet? Fermented foods may be what you've been missing all your life. Known for their active bacteria and sour flavor, fermented foods improve blood sugar, blood pressure, eczema, digestive health, immunity and possibly even mental health and weight.
Dietary staples in cultures worldwide, fermented foods are gaining popularity in the United States amid a rising understanding of the health benefits of probiotics. Fermented foods include kefir, yogurt, kombucha, sauerkraut, miso, kimchi and tempeh.

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Cyber Spies Target Fans of Mexico’s Soda Tax

April 17, 2017

Mexico's per‐capita consumption of soda is the highest in the world, which helps explain why public‐health advocates are so happy about the 2014 Mexican soda tax, which has helped shrink soda consumption by 7.6%. The 10% tax worked so well that Mexican nutrition advocates recently pushed to double the tax.

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Get Mom an Exotic Fruit of the Month

April 17, 2017

Offering a mouthwatering array of fruits, from blood oranges and Asian pears to pomegranates and persimmons, a subscription to an "exotic fruit of the month club" may be the perfect way to keep the Mother's Day spirit alive all year. Sign her up and she'll get a delivery of nutrient‐packed fresh fruit each month, offering a constant reminder of your love.

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Why Fat Shaming Is So Shameful

April 17, 2017

Negative stereotypes of people with obesity have painful consequences—especially if those people come to believe the stereotypes are true. Scientists call this weight‐bias internalization, and they have cause to worry about it.

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