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Len Kravitz

Len Kravitz, PhD is a professor and program coordinator of exercise science at the University of New Mexico where he recently received the Presidential Award of Distinction and the Outstanding Teacher of the Year award. In addition to being a 2016 inductee into the National Fitness Hall of Fame, Dr. Kravitz was awarded the Fitness Educator of the Year by the American Council on Exercise. Just recently, ACSM honored him with writing the 'Paper of the Year' for the ACSM Health and Fitness Journal.

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Article Archive

Comparing Periodization Strategies for Women

April 12, 2017

Study reviewed: Bartolomei, S., et al. 2015. Block vs. weekly undulating periodized resistance training programs in women. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29 (10), 2679—87.

If your clientele includes women looking to boost their muscular strength within a specific time frame, creating periodized weight–training programs for them is a great idea. The question is: How should you structure the program? Bartolomei and colleagues' study published in 2015 offers guidance on two possibilities.

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Getting the Facts on Fatigue

March 15, 2017

Fatigue is a crucial concept for exercisers because it represents the point where they fail to complete a set or feel too exhausted to continue a long-distance run or other endeavor. Fatigue fascinates researchers because it reflects mental, chemical and mechanical processes that affect muscle performance. Indeed, the physiology of fatigue recently inspired the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise to devote a special section to the topic.
I'll review highlights from the journal's special section in a question-and-answer format:

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Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy

December 9, 2016

Clients who want more muscularity need to face one of the most fundamental facts of skeletal muscle hypertrophy: Training to failure is crucial to building bigger muscles. Two original research studies reinforce this reality while offering meaningful new insights into hypertrophy training.

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The Emerging Case Against Antioxidant Supplements

October 14, 2016

We think of muscles as our primary source of movement, but on a deeper level they are intricate molecular machines. During intense exercise, muscle cells manufacture troublemaking molecules called free radicals that can harm biological tissues.

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Fresh Insights on Fat

September 16, 2016

Fresh Insights on Fat
Fat tissues secrete proteins that influence diet and metabolism. What the latest science means to fitness pros.
By Robert Christner, MS & Len Kravitz, PhD

We've long understood that fat is the body's principal energy-storage tissue. However, it's now becoming clear that fat tissue is a major hormone-secreting organ, producing cell–signaling proteins called adipokines that play an important role in metabolism, feeding behaviors, glucose regulation and insulin control (Singla, Bardoloi & Parkash 2010; Al–Suhaimi & Shehzad, 2013).

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Workstation Alternatives

August 26, 2016

The growing body of evidence on the health risks of sitting for hours on
end has a lot of exercise pros wondering: Should we encourage clients to
use standup desks or workstations that allow moderate physical activity?

Emerging research suggests it’s worth a try.

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Dieting Makes You Fat! How?

August 17, 2016

Dieting Makes You Fat! How?

A look at the science which found that contestants in
The Biggest Loser regained most of the weight they lost.

By Len Kravitz, PhD

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Understanding Research Terminology

April 29, 2016

With research studies so easy to find on the Internet, fitness professionals are regularly bombarded by clients asking for interpretations.

Unfortunately, reading and interpreting scientific articles can get frustrating when terminology is unfamiliar and writing styles are wordy or awkward. Scientific journals try to communicate research findings as clearly as possible, but journals often use a highly stylized voice that makes it difficult for the applied professional to grasp the meaning of published studies.

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Active Couch Potatoes, Beware

April 21, 2016

To read more about how to prevent weight regain and bolster metabolic health, please see “New Clues to Prevent Weight Regain” in the online IDEA Library or in the January 2016 print issue of IDEA Fitness Journal. If you cannot access the full article and would like to, please contact the IDEA Inspired Service Team at (800) 999-4332, ext. 7.

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Peripheral Heart Action Training: “What’s Old Is New Again”

April 17, 2016

If you have clients with high blood pressure or health problems that prevent them from using high-intensity interval training, then this study is for you.

The research explores peripheral heart action (PHA) training, a system of conditioning developed by Arthur Steinhaus, PhD, in the 1940s (Piras et al. 2015). PHA aims to keep blood circulating consistently during a resistance training session. Five to six exercises are performed sequentially at a medium intensity—with no rest between them; the exercises alter- nately stress upper- and lower-body muscles (Piras et al. 2015).

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Resistance Training and Diabetes: What’s Best?

March 13, 2016

Resistance training can be a big help to people who either have type 2 diabetes or are at risk of developing it. Ideally, trainers should combine cardiovascular and resistance training to help clients prevent or manage type 2 diabetes, but cardiovascular exercise isn’t always a good fit. In those cases, resistance training may be the only option available.

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Role of Tart Cherries in Exercise and Health

March 7, 2016

Emerging research suggests tart cherry juice has a unique blend of
powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents that help athletes and
exercise enthusiasts recover faster from exhaustive exercise. This
discovery is attracting growing interest among fitness professionals.

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Redefining the Desk Job

February 17, 2016

The growing body of evidence on the health risks of sitting for hours on
end has a lot of exercise pros wondering: Should we encourage clients to
use standup desks or workstations that allow moderate physical activity?

Emerging research suggests it’s worth a try.

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How Effective Is a Tabata Kettlebell-HIIT Program?

January 27, 2016

In May 2015 in San Diego, ACSM’s 62nd annual meeting brought together thousands of professionals from around the globe in more than 70 disciplines to exchange research, present new clinical techniques and share scientific advancements in public health, physical activity, sports medicine and exercise science. This article covers just one of six studies reviewed.

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Understanding and Translating Research

January 14, 2016

With research studies so easy to find on the Internet, fitness professionals are regularly bombarded by clients asking for interpretations.

Unfortunately, reading and interpreting scientific articles can get frustrating when terminology is unfamiliar and writing styles are wordy or awkward. Scientific journals try to communicate research findings as clearly as possible, but journals often use a highly stylized voice that makes it difficult for the applied professional to grasp the meaning of published studies.

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35 Ailments, One Prescription: MOVE!

January 13, 2016

It’s not exactly news that physical activity and exercise have powerful health benefits. Indeed, it’s an insight almost as old as recorded history.

In the fifth century BC, the famous Greek physician Hippocrates observed, “All parts of the body, if used in moderation and exercised in labors to which each is accustomed, become thereby healthy and well developed and age slowly; but if they are unused and left idle, they become liable to disease, defective in growth and age quickly” (Kokkinos
&
Myers 2010).

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