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Len Kravitz

Len Kravitz, PhD is a professor and program coordinator of exercise science at the University of New Mexico where he recently received the Presidential Award of Distinction and the Outstanding Teacher of the Year award. In addition to being a 2016 inductee into the National Fitness Hall of Fame, Dr. Kravitz was awarded the Fitness Educator of the Year by the American Council on Exercise. Just recently, ACSM honored him with writing the 'Paper of the Year' for the ACSM Health and Fitness Journal.

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Article Archive

Anaerobic Training: Program Design

May 21, 2014

Most personal trainers design anaerobic workouts for their clients—it is an innovative strategy that helps many people reach their goals. Competitive athletes have been training anaerobically for years. But these types of programs also offer recreational exercise enthusiasts challenge, variety and unique physiological adaptations. This article provides an overview of the scientific theory and physiology…

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Understanding and Preventing Common Running Injuries

May 20, 2014

Long-distance running continues to attract new enthusiasts throughout the world (Tonoli et al. 2010); its unique combination of benefits can help people to control their weight, improve cardiovascular function and fend off a host of chronic health problems (van Gent et al. 2007; van Middelkoop et al. 2008). But for all these advantages, running is hard on some parts of the body, often leading to lower-extremity injuries (van Middelkoop et al. 2008).

What Are Running Injuries, and How Prevalent Are They?

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The Science of Fat Burning

April 24, 2014

Fat may seem like the enemy of civilized people—especially sedentary ones. Yet we cannot live without it. Fat plays a key role in the structure and flexibility of cell membranes, and it helps regulate the movement of substances through those membranes.

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Exercise and Lifestyle Guidelines for People With Osteoarthritis

April 14, 2014

About 10 years ago, the CDC and the arthritis Foundation launched the national arthritis action Plan: a Public health strategy. This collaboration resulted in a landmark document with a consensus of lifestyle and exercise guidelines for people who suffer from chronic arthritis. here is a synthesis of the physical activity recommendations:

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Metabolic Effects of HIIT

April 14, 2014

High-intensity interval training is enormously popular in the fitness industry this year. HIIT workouts typically include short bursts (6 seconds to 4 minutes) of intense exercise (?90% maximal aerobic capacity) alternating with relief breaks of varying lengths (Kessler, Sisson & Short 2012; Boutcher 2011).

The workouts include a limitless vari- ety of exercises, including

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Anaerobic Metabolic Conditioning

March 13, 2014

Many personal trainers design anaerobic workouts for their clients—it is an innovative strategy that helps many people reach their goals. Competitive athletes have been training anaerobically for years. Bu these types of programs also offer recreational exercise enthusiasts challenge, variety and unique physiological adaptations. Common elements of an anaerobic workout include intervals, sprints, repeated sprints and multiple-sequence exercise combinations performed at higher intensities with shorter duration (Bishop, Girard & Mendez- Villanueva 2011).

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Exercise Benefits People With Osteoarthritis

March 12, 2014

Osteoarthritis (OA), the nation’s most common form of arthritis, is a degenerative joint disease that causes cartilage and its underlying bone to break down, eventually producing joint pain and stiffess (Lubar et al. 2010).

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Walking: The Latest Research

February 20, 2014

We all know the basics on walking: It’s simple, inexpensive and brimming with health benefits. Yet, in an age when exercise technology is increasingly complex and trainers’ clients are developing more sophisticated tastes, questions linger: How can walking provide a worthwhile workout, and how well does walking burn calories? These and many other walking-related issues…

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Resistance Training Periodization in Women: New Insight for Training Design

February 12, 2014

Periodization offers a specific strategy for helping women get stronger with resistance training.

It has been well documented that appropriate resistance training can help people across a broad range of ages, fitness levels and health statuses. Resistance training improves muscular strength, muscular endurance and body composition while assisting the body to manage chronic ailments such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, bone and joint diseases (osteoporosis and osteoarthritis), and depression (Warburton, Nicol & Bredin 2006).

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7 Common Questions On Sarcopenia

February 10, 2014

Does sarcopenia affect men or women to a greater extent?

There is no evidence to support gender specificity in sarcopenia. It is highly related to inactivity; older adults with lower levels of physical activity are more likely to develop sarcopenia.

Is sarcopenia hereditary?

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What Is Sarcopenia, and Can We Turn Back the Clock?

January 16, 2014

What makes us weaken with age? The prime culprit is sarcopenia—age-related loss of muscle mass, strength, power and function (Sayer et al. 2013; Morley 2012). Morley (2012) says 5%–13% of 60- to 70-year-olds and 11%–50% of people in their 80s have sarcopenia, which means “poverty of flesh.”

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5 Questions and Answers About the Heart

January 14, 2014

1. Does heart rate recovery indicate anything about a person’s health?
Yes. Cole et al. (1999) showed that a delayed decrease in heart rate (less than 12 beats slower) during the first minute after a maximal graded exercise may indicate decreased vagal nerve activity and is a powerful predictor of overall mortality.
2. Does exercise training improve recovery heart rate?
Yes. Seiler, Haugen & Kuffel (2007) showed that recovery heart improvement (faster recovery) occurs as fitness level progressively increases.

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The Facts on Obesity

January 13, 2014

The following obesity facts presented by Casazza et al. are well supported by scientific evidence and offer practical guidance for personal trainers.

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What Really Works In Fighting Obesity?

December 11, 2013

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The Physiology of Fat Loss

December 11, 2013

Fat may seem like the enemy of civilized people—especially sedentary ones. Yet we cannot live without it.

Fat plays a key role in the structure and flexibility of cell membranes, and it helps regulate the movement of substances through those membranes. Special types of fat, known as eicosanoids, send hormone-like signals that exert intricate control over many bodily systems, mostly those affecting inflammation or immune function.

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6 Important Questions About Diabetes

October 31, 2013

1. Since high blood glucose is dangerous, is low blood glucose healthy?
When blood glucose levels fall below 70 mg/dl, the condition is called hypoglycemia or low blood glucose. Since the primary fuel of the central nervous system (CNS) is glucose, low blood glucose can dramatically impair CNS function. Hypoglycemia can lead to dizziness, confusion, slurred speech, blurred vision and sleepiness (Gulve 2008).

2. What is glycosylated hemoglobin and the HbA1c test?

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Heart Arrhythmias: An Exercise Professional’s Primer

October 21, 2013

The heart does remarkable work. Roughly the size of a human fist, the heart pumps blood every second of every day, delivering nutrients and oxygen to organs and tissues, and sending waste to filters in the kidneys, liver and lungs.
Yet not every heart works well. A healthy heart relies on a self-generating electrical signaling system to keep it pumping at the right pace; heart maladies that disrupt the signals can dramatically impact a client’s health. Collectively, we call these maladies heart arrhythmias.

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