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Jennie McCary, MS, RD, LD



Article Archive

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November 1, 2012

Answer

Like bean sprouts, sprouted grains are whole grains, such as wheat berries, that are allowed to sprout. In the case of popular sprouted breads, sprouted berries (often wheat but sometimes also oat, millet, barley and/or other varieties) are ground up and baked in the recipe. These little sprouted seeds are thought to pack more of a nutritional punch than unsprouted berries. And compared to refined and enriched grains stripped of the germ and bran, they do.

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September 27, 2012

Answer:

Omega-3 fats are essential fatty acids, meaning we need to get them from food. Well-known for improving heart health, omega-3 fats are necessary
for proper brain functioning and may also help treat asthma and depression. These healthy polyunsaturated fats are found in a variety of foods, but the best source—fish—is not a main staple of the American diet. It’s no wonder that taking fish oil supplements has become the norm. Jumping on the bandwagon, food companies are offering more omega-3-fortified foods and beverages—from breads and cereals to milk and eggs.

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August 22, 2012

Answer

Most people have heard the health warnings about trans fats. They raise LDL (artery-clogging) cholesterol and lower HDL (good) cholesterol, increasing the risk for heart disease and stroke. Trans fats are easier to spot now that the amount is listed on the Nutrition Facts Panel of food labels. However, it is still important to scan the ingredients list for sources of trans fats (hidden as partially hydrogenated oils) because the U.S.

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June 29, 2012

Answer: The variety and availability of dairy-alternative milks have exploded in the marketplace. This is good news for vegans and vegetarians who require plant-based beverages or for those who do not consume dairy products. Dairy-alternative milks also help people with health conditions such as milk allergy and lactose intolerance.

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May 17, 2012

Answer:Postexercise fuel is all about recovery. First priority is hydrating to replace any fluid lost; next step is consuming carbohydrate combined with protein for greater glycogen storage. After endurance exercise, the recommended carb-to-protein ratio is 3–4:1 (3–4 grams of carbohydrate for every gram of protein). Depending on timing, this may be a small snack or your next meal.

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April 22, 2012

Answer: Red wine has enjoyed a solid reputation for being heart healthy because it is a rich source of resveratrol, a phytochemical with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. But in early January an investigation of the work of researcher Dipak K. Das, PhD, ScD, MD, revealed more than 100 counts of falsification and fabrication of data, thus casting doubt on all of his reservatrol research. Das is not the only global researcher investigating resveratrol. Still, the effects of resveratrol are controversial.

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March 22, 2012

Answer: The Paleo Diet suggests that we should model our way of eating on the hunting and gathering techniques of the Paleolithic period. The diet recommends sticking with animal protein, fruits and vegetables, while staying away from dairy, grains, legumes, high-glycemic fruits and veggies, salty foods and refined sugar. It is a high-protein, lower-carb diet that is also promoted to athletes as a way to enhance performance.

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February 17, 2012

Answer: Made popular by the Chia pet, these tiny black seeds offer health benefits beyond watching something green grow. Turns out chia seeds are a good source of fiber and are rich in antioxidants and ALA (alpha-linoleic acid), the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid—
even more so than flaxseed. They also provide a variety of minerals, including iron and calcium.

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January 26, 2012

Answer: Soy is the richest source of legume protein and is very versatile. It is enjoyed in many forms, including edamame, tofu, milk, nuts, tempeh, flour, textured vegetable protein and protein powder.

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January 18, 2012

Answer: Carbohydrates (carbs) are the body’s main source of energy. However, all carbs are not created equal. Telling them apart can improve your health and performance. Examples of “good” carbs are whole grains, fruit, vegetables, beans and low-fat dairy. In other words, “good” carbs are nutrient-rich foods that offer the body more than energy. They come packaged with fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.

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