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Bananas: Giving You a Hand in Your Health

by Jessica L Cline on Dec 13, 2012

Food for Thought

First noted by Alexander the Great on his conquest of India in 327 BC, the banana is America’s top-selling fruit.

Contrary to common perception, the banana actually comes from the world’s largest herbaceous flowering plant—not from a tree. Bananas grow in bunches called “hands”; a group of hands make up a “stem,” which can weigh over 100 pounds.

Nutritional profile. Bananas are known to be rich in potassium. A medium banana can contain 400–600 milligrams of it. A fruit this size also has 2 grams of protein and 4 g of fiber, is very low in calories and fat, and provides a multitude of vitamins and minerals.

For your health. Bananas are known to help treat anemia; lower blood pressure; resolve bowel issues and constipation; boost brain power and energy levels; fight depression; soothe heartburn; replenish the body during hangovers; prevent morning sickness; soothe mosquito bites; calm nerves; help with mood disorders such as premenstrual syndrome and seasonal affective disorder; and decrease stress.

Buying, eating, and unusual uses. Fresh bananas are available year-round. They ripen best off the plant. The more ripe they are, the sweeter they taste. After you’ve eaten a banana, you can use the skin in place of plastic wrap to keep food fresh and give it a unique taste. The peel can also be used to polish shoes!

Sacred status. The banana tree is sacred in many cultures. It is associated with fertility and prosperity for Hindus. Malay women bathe with banana concoctions after childbirth. In India, the banana flower is regarded as a sign of good luck and is often tied to the head for important ceremonies, such as weddings.

—By Jessica Cline

IDEA Fitness Journal, Volume 10, Issue 1

© 2013 by IDEA Health & Fitness Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

About the Author

Jessica L Cline

Jessica L Cline IDEA Author/Presenter

Jessica is an Editorial Assistant at IDEA Health and Fitness Association. She graduated from Colorado State University with a BA in journalism and a BS in health and exercise science. She has a GFI ...

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