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Motivate Without Money

By Chalene Johnson | February 28, 2001 |

When faced with the dilemma of how to motivate employees, many managers simply avoid offering employee incentives because they “don’t have it in the budget.” Yet most employees can be handsomely rewarded if managers budget time, effort and a bit of creativity.

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Kicking Around New Kickboxing Ideas

By IDEA Authors | February 1, 2001 |

Experienced teachers know that class variety is one secret to long-term success and self-preservation. Teaching a wide repertoire of class modes—for instance, step, indoor cycling and kickboxing—can help prevent burnout and improve your teaching skills. Developing options within a mode—endurance cycling, mind-body ride and power spin, for example, or step interval, multiple step and advanced step—is also important.

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Upping the Fun Factor

By April Durrett | January 31, 2001 |

As amazing as it now seems, back in the 1970s we had to prove that aerobic dance could actually increase your heart rate. “Yes, cardio activity is effective,” our new and growing industry
asserted. Once this effectiveness was established, researchers began publishing studies that
detailed injuries sustained
during aerobics classes. So in
the 1980s and 1990s, our
adolescent industry committed
to making classes safe. ‰

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Improving Sports Performance, Client Handout

By IDEA Authors | January 31, 2001 |

client

handout

Expert tips on maintaining health and fitness

Improving Sports Performance
o you want to strengthen your skills in golf, tennis, running, cycling or swimming? Your personal trainer can design a sport-specific fitness workout to meet your needs. The following 10 insights from Patty S. Freedson, PhD, exercise physiologist from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, explain why…

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Specialty Certifications for Personal Trainers

By IDEA Authors | December 31, 2000 |

PERSONAL TRAINER
SPECIALTY CERTIFICATIONS

M

Many personal fitness trainers believe that “average healthy adults” do not exist–virtually everyone has some type of special fitness goal or health issue. Accordingly, there are personal trainers who prepare to meet a variety of clients’ needs, from general fitness to postrehabilitation conditioning, while others concentrate in a specialty area, such…

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So You Want to Start a New Club?

By Michael Scott Scudder | December 31, 2000 |

Each month I receive over a dozen telephone calls from individuals wanting to start new fitness facilities in their communities. Invariably, I hear something like this: “We really don’t have a good health club in our area. None of them take care of people. They cannot hold onto members, especially the 40 and over age group. I want to build a club that appeals to all people. We’ll give superior service and drive our competition out of business in a year.”

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Mastering Food Portion Control, Client Handout

By IDEA Authors | October 31, 2000 |

client

handout

COPY AND DISTRIBUTE TO YOUR CLIENTS

Mastering Food Portion Control
n the past decade, the number of overweight adults in the United States has increased from one in four to one in two. While lack of exercise is a big part of the problem, nutritionists believe that another major culprit is poor portion control. A “megameal” mentality has taken hold in restaurants, fast-food spots,…

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Basics of Sports Nutrition, Client Handout

By IDEA Authors | September 30, 2000 |

client

HANDOUT

Basics of Sports Nutrition
nderstanding sports nutrition can help you make food and drink choices that will complement your physical activity, as well as help improve your endurance, speed recovery from exertion, lower risk of injury and assist in rehabilitation. According to San Diego nutritionist Patti Tveit Milligan, MS, RD, most of the nutrients required for athletic performan…

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Mind-Body Classes:

By IDEA Authors | September 1, 2000 |

Editor’s note: This article is the fourth of a five-part series on guidelines and safety suggestions for various group fitness modalities. The genesis for these articles is you, the IDEA member. In our most recent readership survey, 100 percent of respondents said they wanted to see more space in IDEA publications devoted to injury prevention. In
addition to the five injury prevention articles slated to appear in IDEA Fitness Edge this year, the entire June 2000 issue of IDEA Health & Fitness Source is devoted to this topic.

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Psyche Up (Not Out) Your Participants

By IDEA Authors | September 1, 2000 |

As exercisers change—with time, trends and age—so too do their goals. No longer are people exercising solely to get in physical shape. With more and more evidence surfacing about the positive psychological benefits of exercise, consumers are looking to improve their emotional and mental states as well.

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How Do I Handle an Injured Participant?

By IDEA Authors | September 1, 2000 |

How do I handle an in-class injury? I know the injured person needs immediate attention, but what are the logistics of dealing with the rest of the group? How can I be
responsible to both the class and the injured person? Any ideas that will keep me out of legal hot water plus handle the situation effectively?

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Indoor Cycling: Guidelines & Safety Suggestions

By IDEA Authors | April 1, 2000 |

Indoor cycling has “spun” a revolution in group exercise. Cycling’s reputation as a challenging, no-frills activity, enjoyed by beginners and elite athletes alike, has made it a welcome addition to group exercise schedules around the globe. But indoor cycling is still evolving. For this activity as for any group workout, instructors need to design fun, high-energy classes without compromising safety. Unfortunately, some recent cycling trends may, in fact, be contributing to injuries among participants.

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The Active Range Warm-Up: Getting Hotter With Time

By IDEA Authors | April 1, 2000 |

In the early days of group fitness when everyone wore leg warmers and exercised to Jane Fonda tapes, the warm-up portion of a typical cardio conditioning class included moves borrowed from ballet, jazz dance and yoga. Unending head turns, plié squats, bouncing side bends and inverted calf stretches in the downward dog position were all part and parcel of the typical “aerobic dance” warm-up.

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Memorize and Be Memorable

By IDEA Authors | April 1, 2000 |

You’re a whiz at creating choreography. Now if only you could remember the combinations every time you taught. Or maybe you’re one of those people who can remember every face you see, but when you have to put a name to a face, your memory freezes.

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Invading My Personal Space

By IDEA Authors | April 1, 2000 |

What do I do if a class participant does not appreciate the fact that I have set boundaries around my personal life? Most of my participants understand I am their instructor, not their counselor, best friend or mom. But every so often someone comes along who asks intimate questions, waylays me when I work out, comes early and stays late to chat about personal troubles, or queries other staff and members about me. In one extreme case I even had a client who developed an obvious crush on me and became a major nuisance.

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How to Attract Deconditioned and Aging Populations

By IDEA Authors | February 1, 2000 |

Q:“My goal this year really is to focus on teaching classes that attract deconditioned and aging populations. However, I am stuck on what to call such classes—how to strike that tricky balance between identifying my market and not alienating anyone. How much do deconditioned and 50-plus exercisers want to be separated and labeled? Also, how different should the exercise content be from the content of mainstream beginning and intermediate classes?”

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Step: Guidelines & Safety Benchmarks

By IDEA Authors | February 1, 2000 |

As fitness leaders, we desire to be creative, motivating and fresh. However, we must balance this creative drive with our responsibility to teach safe classes. To achieve a successful balance, we must not only increase our knowledge, but also apply this knowledge. We can minimize risk and maximize continued participation by applying common sense and…

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Using Ethics to Resolve Teaching Dilemmas

By IDEA Authors | February 1, 2000 |

As the new millennium begins to take shape, philosophers and ethicists are again posing questions that have dogged humankind for centuries. What is right? What is good and true? When do we have the right to make decisions for other people? How can we use our reason and intuition to be the best we can be; to contribute to the new epoch?

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Vegetarianism and the Athlete

By Catherine Reade, MS, RD | January 31, 2000 |

It decreases the risk of heart disease, stroke, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and cancer (American Dietetic Association [ADA] 1997). No, it isn’t the latest pharmaceutical wonder or a breakthrough supplement being hawked on late-night infomercials. You may be surprised to learn that this mystery elixir is actually a vegetarian diet!

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