Time to Eat Rye Crackers? Whole Grains and Prediabetes

By Alexandra Williams, MA on Feb 18, 2013

More whole-grain good news, this time from Sweden. Over 5,500 Swedish residents tracked and measured their intake of whole and refined grains. Ten years later, those who ate more than 59 g (about 2 ounces) of whole grains per day were 27% less likely to becomeprediabetic than those who ate 30 g or less.

The average American eats 15 g of whole grain daily, with fewer than 3% getting the recommended 48 g per day. What’s more, the definition of whole grain differs between the U.S. and Sweden. In the U.S., food manufacturers can label foods as whole grain if they contain just 8 g of whole grains per serving; in Sweden, products must be at least 50% whole grain to receive the label.

The report was published online by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.o45583).

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Alexandra Williams, MA

Alexandra Williams has taught fitness for 17 years and has a master’s degree in agency counseling, with an emphasis on marriage and family. Her professional training has forced her to scrutinize her own value system, especially as she attempts to raise ethical children. The author wishes to thank Jack Raglin and Jim Gavin for their helpful insights and suggestions.

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