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Ready, Set…Mud!

By IDEA Authors | June 23, 2014 |

Does the idea of running a mud race appeal to you? Anyone who signs up for an obstacle challenge—whether for the fun, the teamwork (or, sometimes, the beer!)— will soon confront the substantial physical and mental demands of these races.

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Making The Most Of Outdoor Fitness

By Melanie Webb | May 14, 2014 |

Adding outdoor activities to your fitness programming can effectively increase the overall health and well-being of your clients. Use these tips to find the right partners to meet your goals and to keep your clients safe while enjoying the great outdoors.

Risk Management

Preparation. Mother nature is ultimately in charge in the outdoors. Minimize risk with an operation plan that addresses the following:

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Mad for the Mud

By Amanda Vogel, MA | March 17, 2014 |

We’ve seen many activity trends come and go in the fitness industry, but perhaps none quite as “dirty” as the current obsession with mud runs and obstacle races. While some events are milder than others, many could be described as an “ordeal” that also happens to be a workout. For example, you might find yourself slopping through mud, scaling impossibly high verticals and pushing yourself to the limit—physically and mentally.

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Mad for the Mud

By Amanda Vogel, MA | February 11, 2014 |

We’ve seen many activity trends come and go in the fitness industry, but per- haps none quite as “dirty” as the current obsession with mud runs and obstacle races. While some events are milder than others, many could be described as an “ordeal” that also happens to be a workout. For example, you might find yourself slopping through mud, scaling impossibly high verticals and pushing yourself to the limit—physically and mentally.

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Extreme Fitness: How Intense Is Too Intense?

By Amanda Vogel, MA | January 21, 2014 |

Imagine a client has just finished a workout or fitness class with you. In evaluating the workout—which you designed to be quite challenging—the client admits, somewhat disappointedly, that although she worked up a good sweat, your session wasn’t a “killer.” She has experienced harder workouts from other trainers, classes or programs.

What’s your reaction? Do you still feel satisfied that you gave the client an appropriate workout? You weren’t going for “killer” anyway. Or do you feel a twinge of regret or competitiveness? Next time, you’ll up the ante.

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Novice Marathoners Beware

By Ryan Halvorson | December 12, 2013 |

According to www.findmymarathon.com, 529,435 people finished marathons in the United States and Canada in 2012. Although marathon running is a pop- ular sport, recent research warns that “amateur runners” who participate may increase their cardiac risk.

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“Have you trained any clients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery? Do you have any special precautions or suggestions?”

By IDEA Authors | October 24, 2013 |

Working with clients who have had gastric bypass surgery requires some extra caution and attention. I first met one such client about a year after her surgery. I asked her a ton of questions because I wanted to understand her motivation, why she decided to have the surgery, what her experience had been living with the result, what her restrictions and limitations were and how she was working within those limitations—her successes and challenges. One of the things I’ve learned about fitness and clients is that everything stems from their thinking process.

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Heart Arrhythmias: An Exercise Professional’s Primer

By Len Kravitz, PhD | October 21, 2013 |

The heart does remarkable work. Roughly the size of a human fist, the heart pumps blood every second of every day, delivering nutrients and oxygen to organs and tissues, and sending waste to filters in the kidneys, liver and lungs.
Yet not every heart works well. A healthy heart relies on a self-generating electrical signaling system to keep it pumping at the right pace; heart maladies that disrupt the signals can dramatically impact a client’s health. Collectively, we call these maladies heart arrhythmias.

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CSPI’s Aloe Warning: “Save It for Sunburns”

By Sandy Todd Webster | October 21, 2013 |

If you are ingesting aloe vera as part of a supplemental regimen to detoxify your body, to balance stomach acidity or to promote overall well-being, the Centers for Science in the Public Interest urges you to think twice.
In August, the CSPI gave aloe vera an “avoid” rating in its “Chemical Cuisine” guide to food additives (www.cspinet.org/reports/chemcuisine.htm), citing studies by the U.S. government showing that aloe vera extracts caused intestinal cancers in male and female lab rats. “Save it for sunburns,” said CSPI executive director Michael F. Jacobson.

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Keeping Aerialists Flying Safely

By Jennifer Curry Wingrove | September 26, 2013 |

Aerial, circus and acrobatic arts have recently seen an explosion of interest, thanks in part to the popularity of performance companies like Cirque du Soleil®. Combine this curiosity with the fun and variety that an aerial-based workout provides, and it’s easy to see what makes this an exciting fitness genre.

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Fit For Driving

By Katy Bowman, MS | September 24, 2013 |

Driving isn’t a sport for most of us, yet it does require strength, motor skill, joint mobility and fast reaction time. Chances are you aren’t offering functional exercise training for “driving skills,” but if you work with a senior population, you should be.

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Yoga Adjustments

By | August 23, 2013 |

Think back to a recent time when you left a yoga class and felt joyfully transformed. Maybe the teacher had great auditory and visual cues. Maybe he or she made you feel safe and supported, allowing you to explore poses in deeper and more rewarding ways than you would have been able to on your own. A well-balanced yoga teacher connects with all types of learners—auditory, visual and kinesthetic. The most fulfilling classes happen when the teacher successfully blends all three teaching modalities.

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