Witch Fingers® Grapes

By Sandy Todd Webster
May 27, 2014

At first glance, a group of these crazy-looking Witch Fingers grapes more closely resembles a cluster of chili peppers than any recognizable fruit. Cultivated by Grapery®, a specialty grape grower in Southern California, these hybrids are as sweet as they are unusual looking.

“Take a good, long look at these long and freaky-looking grapes,” says the Grapery website. “We admit that their shape is weird, but wait until you put these ‘fingers’ in your mouth. Witch Fingers are wickedly sweet and fun to eat. Kids just go bonkers for them. But grown-ups are intrigued by them, too. Serve them at a party and check out the looks on people’s faces. They make a great conversation starter, and once people try them, they can’t stop eat- ing or talking about them.”

Availability. Get them now, as these unusual grapes are available for only a short time in midsummer.

Grower facts. Witch Fingers were created by a process of hybridization, using hand pollination, between an American cultivar (developed by the University of Arkansas division of agriculture fruit research station) and a Mediterranean variety.

Flavor and texture. According to the Specialty Produce app, these grapes have a crisp, thin skin over pale flesh. Their flavor is very sweet, not overly tannic, and low in acidity. “The overall taste is reminiscent of plums,” says the app.

Uses. Enjoy them fresh off the cluster. They make a great snack for kids, who will find the playful shape and sweet taste appealing. Consider adding them to fruit salads or serving them with an array of mild cheeses and nuts.

Sourcing. Look for them at specialty markets and at your local farmers’ market.

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Sandy Todd Webster

Sandy Todd Webster is the editor in chief of IDEA’s award-winning publications. She is Precision Nutrition Level 1 certified and is a Rouxbe Certified Plant-Based Professional cook.

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