Despite the current lagging economy, many consumers are still willing to pay more for organic foods, believing these foods are higher in nutritional quality
than conventionally grown foodstuff.
A recent study may put the kibosh on
such thinking, after scientists found little difference in the nutritional quality of foods grown organically as opposed to conventionally.

The researchers reviewed more than 55 separate studies conducted over a 50-year period that compared the nutrient quality of common organic food with food that was conventionally grown. The study included a sampling of both produce crops and livestock products.

Reporting in the September issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers found little difference in the quality of the produce studied and no difference at all in the quality of the livestock products. “On the basis of a systemic review of studies of satisfactory quality, there is no evidence of a difference in
nutrient quality between organically
and conventionally produced foodstuffs,”
the authors concluded.

It should be noted that this research
review did not test for pesticides or other contaminants, only for nutritional quality. Many experts still recommend opting for organic when buying certain produce, such as apples, potatoes, lettuce, celery, bell peppers, cherries, strawberries, spinach, peaches, carrots and nectarines.