appetizers

By Sandy Todd Webster
Mar 16, 2015

Here’s a taste of what’s cooking in the nutrition world:

Yet another food tribe is born. Have you heard of reducetarianism? You may even be a reducetarian and not know it. According to www.reducetarianism .com, this “-ism” is “an identity, community, and movement” composed of those who are committed
to eating less red meat, poultry, seafood and other animal products. “The concept is appealing because not everyone is able or willing to completely eliminate meat from their diet,” says the organization’s website. Hmm. Don’t flexitarians already have this distinction?

Are you a stress eater? Do you have clients who fall off the healthy-eating wagon when life gets a little rocky? Understanding what triggers a person to run into the grip of sugar, salt and fat for comfort can go a long way toward eliminating the behavior. A new app called RELAX is being tried in a pilot study at University of Massachusetts Medical School and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Using text inputs, barcode scanning and GPS technology, the RELAX app will track eating patterns, daily activities, exercise, user mood and stress-inducing events. It will also provide users with an itemized list of foods consumed, identify high-stress moments during the day, and illustrate the relationship between food intake and stress. The information collected will help users better understand habits tied to emotional or stress eating.

Innovators at WikiFoodsTM looked to nature for inspiration and have combined that with smart technology to wrap foods and beverages in plastic-free, edible packages made of natural ingredients. “Like the skins of grapes, WikiFood envelopes are not just barriers against water loss and contaminant entry,” explains the website. “They are also delicious and potential carriers of nutrition, and may deliver unique nutrients just like the skin of a fruit.” Imagine a ball of soft cheese with edible coating, or a sphere of yogurt wrapped in a fruit skin that you can pop into your mouth on the go. The New York Times Magazine has cited the technology among the 32 innovations that will “change tomorrow.”

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Sandy Todd Webster

Sandy Todd Webster is the editor in chief of IDEA’s award-winning publications. She is Precision Nutrition Level 1 certified and is a Rouxbe Certified Plant-Based Professional cook.

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