nutrition_news

Beware New Trans Fat Substitute

by Diane Lofshult
Just when consumers have finally learned to avoid foods that contain dangerous trans fat, someone has created a substitute ingredient that’s just as bad for you. Pass along the word to your clients: they now need to check food labels for something called interesterified oil, a stealth component in many new processed foods that claim to be free of trans fat. Like trans ...

Tall People Have Higher BMIs

by Diane Lofshult
When it comes to stature, there may be an advantage to being short, says a study published in the February issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the past, shorter American men and women typically had “significantly higher” body mass indexes (BMIs) than their taller counterpa...

About Face & Diet

by Diane Lofshult
Want that dewy, flawless skin that you see in ads in women’s magazines? One way to achieve that healthy glow may be by improving the food you put into your body. While it is understood that nutrition plays a key role in normal dermatologic functioning, little was known until recently about the effects of diet and skin appearance. Now a study ...

Saccharin Linked to Weight Gain

by Diane Lofshult
Before you dump that little pink packet of Sweet’N Low into your next cup of tea, consider this: a new study has found that using an artificial, no-calorie sweetener in place of sugar may be hazardous to your weight loss goals. Reporting in the January issue of the journal Behavioral Neuroscience, researchers found that rat...

Better Diet, Better School Grades

by Diane Lofshult
We’ve all heard that kids need to eat breakfast to sustain their energy over the course of their active days. But a Taiwanese study published in the November 2007 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association suggests that a healthy diet can also improve grades in elementary-school children. ...

Can College Students Read Food Labels?

by Diane Lofshult
Surveys have shown that the majority of adult consumers now check nutrition facts labels when they first try new products. Many shoppers use these helpful labels to make educated food choices and to lose or maintain weight. Label users tend to have diets that are lower in fat and cholesterol and higher in healthy fruits and vegetables. But ho...

Spring Onions

by Diane Lofshult
Like the first flowers appearing out of the snow, the first spring onions are peeking out of produce bins right about now. Spring onions are basically more developed than the green onion, but not as mature as a regular onion. These spring shoots tend to be milder in flavor and more tender than full-grown onions. Here’s how to pick the best of the bunch. ...

How to Cut Fruit, Not Fingers

by Diane Lofshult
Cutting up round fruit, like apples, can be dicey. Instead of apple slices, you may end up with real finger food! To avoid injury, try this neat tip from the editors of Cooking Light magazine: Before slicing, trim about a ½ inch off the bottom of any round fruit (or veggie) to...

Website Finds Food Recalls

by Diane Lofshult
It’s hard enough to remember to bring along a shopping list to the grocery store. How are we supposed to keep track of which foods and beverages have been recalled lately by the federal government? Fret not, fellow shoppers. There is now a website to help you identify all food products that have recently been recalled. Plus, a photo of each i...

Hot Tap Water Alert

by Diane Lofshult
When it comes to your health, drinking hot water straight from the tap may get you into, well, hot water. While it can be tempting to simply drop a tea bag into piping-hot tap water instead of going to the trouble to boil your brew, don’t do it. The reason you should avoid hot tap water is because it dissolves contaminants more quickly than co...
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