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Injury / Injury Prevention

Injury Prevention: Yoga

By Leigh Crews | January 31, 2006 |

According to the 2005 IDEA Fitness Programs & Equipment Survey, 66% of respondents offer yoga programming and 56% believe it will grow (Ryan 2005). Yoga is an increasingly popular choice because it adds a mindful dimension to fitness repertoires and is easier on joints. The improved strengthening and stretching element complements the appeal.
Many people use “fitne…

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Pilates Mat Exercises Reduce Low-Back Pain

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | January 31, 2006 |

People with low-back pain who practiced Pilates mat exercises for only 1 hour twice per week experienced improvement in their condition, according to a small study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (2005; 37 [5], S27).
For 12 weeks, researchers studied 22 subjects with a history of low-back pain. Fifteen participated in the Pilates mat program, …

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Vigorous Exercise Lessens Pain in Older Exercisers

By Joy Keller | December 31, 2005 |

Musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint, especially as age encroaches. A recent study in the September 19 issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy (2005; 7 [6], 1263–70) found that older adults who exercise consistently over a long period of time experience about 25% less pain than their sedentary counterparts.
Researchers followed more than 800 runners and inactive…

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Shovel Snow Like a Pro

By Joy Keller | December 31, 2005 |

It’s that time of year when gym members hobble in with wrenched backs from shoveling snow. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in 2004 more than 44,000 people were treated for snow-shoveling- and snow-blowing-related injuries. A few preventive measures go a long way. Share some of the following tips from Pam Pedlow, MHK, MES, founder of Fitness, Function & Perfor…

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Exercise Good for Chronic, Not Acute, Low-Back Pain

By IDEA Authors | October 31, 2005 |

Who hasn’t experienced some type of back pain? Whether it’s acute and hits suddenly, or it’s chronic and comes and goes over time, back pain is a fairly common complaint. Research fellows at the Institute for Work & Health in Toronto examined 61 studies of more than 6,000 adults with low-back pain. Results were published in the May 3 issue of the Annals of Internal M…

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Forgiveness Linked to Less Back Pain

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | October 31, 2005 |

Loving-kindness meditation, an ancient Buddhist practice used to develop love and to transform anger into compassion, eased back pain in chronic sufferers taking part in a pilot study at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.
Forty-three subjects were randomly assigned to either the meditation intervention or usual care. Standardized measures assessed patients&rsqu…

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The Lumbar Spine

By Catherine Logan, MSPT | April 30, 2005 |

Anatomy Review

The spinal cord begins as an extension of the brain. It is surrounded by the bony vertebral column, which acts as a protective mechanism. Any information (sensory or motor) that the brain needs to relay to the body travels via the spinal cord. Fortunately, the spinal cord is protected by vertebrae, so spinal-cord injuries are not common, and most …

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Preventing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

By IDEA Authors | April 30, 2005 |

Do you use the computer all day long? Then you may be at risk for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a painful, progressive condition caused by compression of a key nerve in the wrist.
What causes CTS and what can you do to prevent it? To find out, read these insights from Stephanie Hoffman, MS, PT, physical therapist and owner of La Jolla Shores Physical Therapy in La Jolla, Californ…

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Martial Arts Injuries

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | April 30, 2005 |

Approximately 8 million Americans currently practice some form of martial art. Given the rising popularity of martial arts, sports medicine researchers decided to compare injury rates among practitioners of various styles. Tae kwon do participants experience a higher rate of inju…

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tai chi reduces falls in high-risk elderly by 25%

By Shirley Archer-Eichenberger, JD, MA | September 30, 2004 |

Frail older adults who practiced tai chi reduced their risk of falling,
according to a study conducted at Emory University Medical School
in Atlanta.
Researchers noted that adults in their 70s, 80s and 90s—some of whom could not walk without assistance—who participated in weekly tai chi for 48 weeks had fewer falls than subjects who participated in wellness education, according to results published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2003; 51 [12], 1804–5).

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Time Wounds All Heels

By Brian L. Springer, MD | September 30, 2004 |

The foot is divided into three regions: rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot. The top of the foot is referred to as the dorsum or dorsal surface; the sole of the foot is referred to as the plantar surface. There is a fair amount of overlap among the regions, with some structures originating proximal and traversing distal. As a result, injury to a proximal (close) structure may result in distal (distant) symptoms.

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Counteracting Momentum During Exercise

By Amy Ashmore, PhD | August 31, 2004 |

One of the most common mistakes exercisers make during strength training is
to use momentum. For everyday movements, the use of momentum is normal and adaptive. It is the body’s way of conserving energy, particularly during running, throwing or pushing activities. But during strength training, momentum is counterproductive because it decreases the work a muscle does, thereby decreasing the effectiveness of the exercise. What’s worse, it is dangerous to the joints and spinal cord, since it overloads these areas, causing unnecessary “wear and tear.”

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does stretching reduce injury risk?

By Ralph La Forge, MS | May 31, 2004 |

Thacker, S.B., et al. 2004. The impact of stretching on sports injury risk: A systematic review of the literature. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 36 (3): 371–8.

Purpose. Researchers at the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion systematically reviewed the research literature in order to assess whether stretching effectively prevents sports injuries and to make recommendations for research and prevention.

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Kids’ Sports Get Serious

By Tracy Morgan-Handzel | April 30, 2004 |

Physical education (PE) may be waning in schools but sport participation among U.S. children and adolescents is on the rise. In 2001 SGMA International reported that more than 7 million high-school-age youth participated in at least one organized sport. The National Safe Kids Campaign estimates that nearly three-quarters of U.S. households with school-age children have…

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