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Sanna Delmonico, MS, RDN, CHE

Sanna is an instructor at The Culinary Institute of America in the Napa Valley, where she teaches food safety, gastronomy and nutrition to culinary students and chefs.

Article Archive

Ask the RD

December 7, 2018

QUESTION: I know white sugar isn’t good for me, but what about other sugars? Are alternative sugars like honey and agave syrup any healthier?

ANSWER: Too much added sugar is linked to increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease, which is why the American Heart Association recommends no more than 25 grams (about 6 teaspoons) of added sugar per day for women and 38 g (9 teaspoons) per day for men (AHA 2018).

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Nutrition Misfires

October 12, 2018

Have you ever made a recommendation to a client, then discovered the client heard something completely different? Or she took part of what you suggested and ignored the rest? Like the time I advised my client about the healthfulness of berries and later found out he had given up all other fruit. That was a nutrition misfire. Maybe it was the client’s all-or-nothing thinking, or maybe I hadn’t been clear enough. After all, there is subtlety in food and nutrition, and getting the message right is a challenge.

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Ask the RD

October 11, 2018

QUESTION: What are lectins, and why are people saying they are so harmful to health? Should I really give up eating beans?

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Ask the RD

September 19, 2018

Question: I have a sensitivity or allergy to tomatoes. My mouth and esophagus get itchy and sore when I eat them. Is there any way to make tomatoes less irritating? Is there a good substitute for tomatoes in recipes?
Answer: You may suffer from oral allergy syndrome (OAS), a relatively common reaction to plant foods, including tomatoes. People who have pollen allergies are more likely to have OAS (Asero 2013) because they react to similar proteins in vegetables, fruits and/or nuts.

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Ask the RD

August 14, 2018

Question: I cook for the week on Sunday. I might bake a chicken, make a big batch of quinoa and steam vegetables so I can make lunch and dinner quickly during the week. But I find I am eating the exact same foods every day. Is this okay for overall nutrition? Could I be missing nutrients?

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Ask the RD

June 19, 2018

Question: I have heard that drinking apple cider vinegar is good for weight loss. Is that true, or is it too good to be true?

Answer: Apple cider vinegar has a cure-all reputation for helping with weight loss, cholesterol,
diabetes, acne, digestive problems and other issues. The truth is somewhat less impressive, but apple
cider vinegar does have proven health benefits.

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What Are the Most Nutritious Eggs?

May 17, 2018

Question: What are the most nutritious eggs? There are so many kinds in the supermarket—brown, white, omega-3, free-range. Are there any differences?

Answer: Egg nutrients include protein, fat, vitamin A and choline. Eggs do have cholesterol, but cholesterol in food has little impact on cholesterol in your blood.
Do different eggs have different nutrition profiles? First of all, there is no nutritional difference between white and brown eggs. Different breeds of chickens simply lay eggs of different colors, from white to brown to green.

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Ask the RD

April 18, 2018

Question: I bought tahini to make hummus, and now I have most of the jar left. Are tahini and sesame seeds nutritious, and what else can I use them for?

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Ask the RD: Is Moringa Powder Similar to Matcha?

March 15, 2018

Answer: Green moringa powder is made from the dried leaves of
the moringa tree, also known as the drumstick tree, and is used in drinks and smoothies like matcha powder, although it doesn’t contain caffeine. Like green tea and leafy green vegetables, moringa leaves are high in antioxidant compounds. They have been used as food and traditional medicine for hundreds of years and reputedly have anti-inflammatory effects, help reduce blood pressure, lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels, and may have anticancer properties (Leone et al. 2015; Stohs & Hartman 2015).

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