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Matthew Kadey

Matthew Kadey, MS, RD, is a James Beard Award–winning food journalist, dietitian and author of the cookbook Rocket Fuel: Power-Packed Food for Sport + Adventure (VeloPress 2016). He has written for dozens of magazines, including Runner’s World, Men’s Health, Shape, Men’s Fitness and Muscle and Fitness.

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Article Archive

Study Reveals How to Eat on the Cheap

August 20, 2019

We all know that a nourishing diet is a pathway to better health. But healthy food often gets a bad rap for being pricey, especially for those on lower incomes.

Fortunately, eating well doesn’t have to break the bank. An investigation in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that, on average, it can cost $25 a day for a family of four to eat healthful meals that meet USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

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There Is Something Fishy About American Seafood

August 20, 2019

Seafood fraud is rife in the U.S., with 1 in 5 samples mislabeled, according to a new report from Oceana. In testing 449 seafood samples from more than 250 locations across 24 states, the nonprofit conservation group found that about 20% of species, especially sea bass and red snapper, were falsely labeled. As an example, DNA tests showed that a fish labeled “sea bass” could be, in fact, giant perch or Nile tilapia.

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What We Aren’t Eating Is Killing Us

August 20, 2019

Bad diet choices lead to more deaths worldwide than any other risk factor, including smoking and obesity, according to the Global Burden of Disease study reported in the April issue of The Lancet. The problem is not only that people around the globe are eating too many unhealthy foods; it’s also that people aren’t eating enough nutritious options. In 2017, there were 11 million deaths in 195 countries from health issues attributable to dietary factors (those issues include heart attack and cancer).

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Advice on Salt Targets Heart Disease

August 20, 2019

While sodium is rampant in fast food, pizza and deli items, it can also be hiding in surprising amounts in everything from bread to ketchup to cereal. As a result, the average sodium intake of Americans is about 3,400 milligrams daily, mainly from commercial sources like restaurant meals and packaged foods. The latest advice on limiting salt intake comes in a new report released by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that ties lower sodium intake to less risk of chronic disease.

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Eating Sugar Is Not Such a Rush After All

August 20, 2019

People may want to rethink eating that donut to power through a 3 p.m. energy slump. The “sugar rush” trope appears to be a myth, and, in fact, consuming too many sweet carbs can make you feel worse, not better. That’s the conclusion of a research paper published in the journal Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, which pooled data from 31 previous studies involving 1,259 participants. The data showed that individuals who ate sugary foods reported feeling more fatigued within an hour of consumption than those who abstained.

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Women Need Protein, Too

August 20, 2019

For years we’ve heard that people who regularly lift weights can benefit from eating higher amounts of protein than the general population. There’s just one glaring problem. Most of the research behind this advice was conducted on men, with little focus on women. Now, a study in the April 2019 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise has shed light on the specific protein needs of this understudied demographic.

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The Market for CBD Products Is Booming

August 20, 2019

Passage of the 2018 Farm Bill opened America’s doors to hemp agriculture, from which cannabidiol (CBD) is derived. Since then, there has been a flood of CBD-infused foods and beverages hitting the market. (CBD that is extracted from other cannabis plants, including marijuana, is technically illegal on a federal level.) Everything from coffee to sparkling water to protein powder can now be found with CBD, and a recent survey reports that roughly 40% of U.S. adults ages 21 and over are willing to give these products a try. In 2017, U.S.

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Recipe for Health: Mediterranean Lentil Sandwiches

June 19, 2019

Over the past few decades, the much-vaunted Mediterranean diet’s ability to lessen the risk for an array of ills, including heart disease and Alzheimer’s, has featured prominently in research. But there weren’t any randomized trials conducted in the United States to determine this diet’s long-term impact on Americans’ health measures—until now.

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July 2019 Question of the Month: Eggs and Cholesterol

June 19, 2019

Here we go again. Just when we thought we could eat our omelets guilt-free, out comes another headline-grabbing study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association that rekindles the debate on whether we should fret about cholesterol intake.

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How Much Fiber Should We Eat to Stay Healthy?

June 19, 2019

The fact that fiber is good for us isn’t breaking news. But now we have a better idea of just how much we should be eating to add years to our lives. A study commissioned by several health and educational entities, including the World Health Organization, and published in The Lancet analyzed 40 years’ worth of data from 243 previous observational studies and randomized controlled trials.

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Social Media May Sway Kids to Eat More Junk

June 19, 2019

Any child active on social media is likely following one or more so-called influencers, and if those influencers are fans of chips and cookies, parents trying to persuade their kids to eat more veggies could be facing another hurdle.

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Take the Steam Out of Tea Time

June 19, 2019

Tea is the drink of choice for more than a billion people. Recent decades have borne witness to a raft of research suggesting that sipping the ancient beverage brings certain health perks. But it is best to brew your cuppa and then let it cool.

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Millennials Have the Biggest Appetite for Organic

June 18, 2019

The organic food market in America is valued at more than $43 billion, and millennials are now the biggest consumers in this food sector. According to a survey conducted by the Organic Trade Association, parents in the 18- to 34-year-old age range are more likely to drop organic broccoli and organic milk into their shopping carts than are Generation X parents (ages 35–50) or baby boomers (ages 51–69). Data showed that 52% of organic food customers are millennials, whereas Gen Xers account for 35%, and baby boomers represent just 14%.

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Fast Food Is as Fattening as Ever

June 18, 2019

Finding prepared salads when you’re in a hurry may be easier than it used to be, but good news about fast food is still rare. Case in point: A study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that tracked foods from 10 popular fast-food restaurants (including Wendy’s and McDonalds) in 1986, 1991 and 2016 found that entrées, on average, increased by 30 calories per decade, while desserts shot up by 62 calories per decade.

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Using Canada’s Plate Model for Food Guidelines

June 18, 2019

Before the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services puts forth the updated Dietary Guidelines for Americans—it’s now soliciting public input at dietaryguidelines.gov for the reveal in 2020—perhaps the authors should look north for inspiration.

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