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Matthew Kadey

Matthew Kadey, MS, RD, is a James Beard Award–winning food journalist, dietitian and author of the cookbook Rocket Fuel: Power-Packed Food for Sport + Adventure (VeloPress 2016). He has written for dozens of magazines, including Runner’s World, Men’s Health, Shape, Men’s Fitness and Muscle and Fitness.

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Article Archive

Bobbing for Apples

February 12, 2018

If you’re concerned about any lingering pesticides on your apples (after all, they are among the most heavily sprayed crops in America) but the price of organic causes too much pain at the checkout, then consider giving your fruit a baking soda bath.

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Another Sugar Downer

February 12, 2018

Consuming too many sweet drinks, doughnuts and chocolate bars may lead not only to a belly bulge but also to a sour mood. After accounting for confounding factors like socio-economic status, body weight and smoking, researchers from University College London found a link between high sugar intake and mental conditions like depression and anxiety in men, according to research published in the July 2017 edition of Scientific Reports.

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Want to Eat Less Salt? Try Adding Pepper

February 12, 2018

Most Americans consume well over the daily recommended intake of sodium (hello, packaged and restaurant foods), but turning up the heat on your meals may help you get by with less, according to the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

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Attack of the Snacks

February 12, 2018

Our increasingly harried lives are driving a shift toward eating more grab-and-go snack foods instead of sit-down meals, but research published in Appetite in January 2018 shows that just seeing the word snack on a food label may lead us to eat more.

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Fatten Up Your Salads

February 12, 2018

Mary Poppins famously advised that “a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.” Now, it looks like a spoonful of oil helps nutrition levels go up—if we apply the right oils to certain veggies. In a study published recently in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers at Iowa State University found that subjects who ate salads with added soybean oil absorbed several key nutrients and antioxidants, including beta-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin K and lycopene, better than when they munched on salads minus the oil.

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Rethink Dining Alone

February 12, 2018

If your dining company is more likely to be a smartphone than a living, breathing human, you could be on the path to health woes that go well beyond heartburn. A paper published in Obesity Research & Clinical Practice in October 2017 suggests that the increasingly common practice of trading in family meals for less formal, more sporadic solo eating could raise the risk of developing maladies like heart disease and diabetes.

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Roasted Potatoes With Herb Caper Sauce

January 17, 2018

Every few years there seems to be another diet trumpeting the need to keep potatoes off your kitchen playlist. When prepared right, however, the humble spud is more of a nutritional saint than a villain.

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Fire It Up

January 17, 2018

Looking for some heat this winter? Turning up the furnace on your meals with chilies may make it easier to stay on good terms with the scale, according to a study conducted by OminActive Health Technologies and University of Arizona and published in Advances in Nutrition in 2017.

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BPA Replacements Show Promise

January 17, 2018

In the past decade or so, a number of studies have suggested that high exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical compound used in the lining of many canned foods and drinks (as well as in plastics, to make them tougher), could raise the risk for everything from heart disease to diabetes to weight gain.

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Rise of the Plants

January 17, 2018

While meat remains the primary protein source for most Americans, it appears that more people are considering serving up chickpeas instead of chicken more often. According to the market research firm Nielsen, 22% of Americans plan to cut back on their meat intake, and 15% of those surveyed wish to bump up their intake of plant proteins like legumes, nuts and seeds, according to a 2017 report from FoodNavigator-USA.

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Looking on the Bright Side

January 17, 2018

From previous research, we know that eating together as a family tends to improve the nutritional status of the children in the household and reduce their risk of becoming overweight. But less has been known about how the emotional climate of mealtimes influences the foods children choose to eat.

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Not-So-Sweet News About Caffeine

January 17, 2018

No wonder so many people drown their coffee in sugar and gravitate toward saccharine breakfast foods. In 2017, the Journal of Food Science reported that people rated a sweetened caffeinated coffee as less sweet than a sweetened decaf coffee. A sugar solution consumed after the coffee was also deemed less sweet in the caffeine trial. Interestingly, there was no impact on other taste sensations, namely bitter, sour, salty or umami. Caffeine appears to dull receptors in our sweet-sensitive taste cells.

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Rise and Dine

January 17, 2018

Weight loss efforts often focus on what and how much food we eat. But it turns out we should also think about when calories go down our gullets. Based on dietary data from more than 50,000 adults, a recent study in The Journal of Nutrition reported that people who consumed their largest meal of the day at breakfast had a lower average body mass index than those who ate their most substantial meal at dinner, even when overall calorie count was similar.

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Sweet Nothings

January 16, 2018

Even health warriors can fall prey to the devious ways of sugar. In a 2017 study published in Clinical Science, nutrition scientists found that in otherwise healthy men (the control group in the study), eating a high-sugar diet for 3 months—650 calories a day from sugar—raised fat levels in the blood and liver, potentially heightening the risk for cardiovascular disease. It appears that, even in healthy populations, consuming excessive amounts of sugar can alter fat metabolism in ways that could increase the risk for health woes.

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Pump up the Volume

January 16, 2018

The sheer number of calories in a plate heaped with pasta alfredo may not be the only reason you push away from the table feeling stuffed. A study presented at a 2017 meeting of the British Psychological Society suggests that sensations of hunger and satiety may be linked to how we perceive a meal, not just how many calories we consume.

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School of Fish

December 21, 2017

Seafood can be a culinary Jekyll and Hyde.
While most fish species boast a nutritional profile that outclasses meats like beef and chicken, industrial-scale fishing can carry a heavy environmental burden. And some fish are swimming with contaminants you don’t want in your diet.
But there’s no need to spurn seafood entirely. Just get better informed so you can make the best choices for you and the planet. Following these rules can help:

Eat More

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Is Flexitarian Eating Right for You?

October 10, 2017

Are you tempted to become a vegetarian, but the thought of giving up barbecues or your mom’s meatloaf seems too daunting? Thankfully, you can obtain many of the same benefits of vegetarian living without forgoing meat completely. You just have to become a “flexitarian.”

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