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Matthew Kadey

Matthew Kadey, MS, RD, is a James Beard Award–winning food journalist, dietitian and author of the cookbook Rocket Fuel: Power-Packed Food for Sport + Adventure (VeloPress 2016). He has written for dozens of magazines, including Runner’s World, Men’s Health, Shape, Men’s Fitness and Muscle and Fitness.

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Article Archive

A Hotter Planet Could Make Our Food Less Potent

December 7, 2018

Rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in our atmosphere not only lead to a warmer planet; they may also place millions of people at risk for certain nutritional deficiencies, according to research published in Nature Climate Change in September 2018.

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Open The Taps

December 7, 2018

When you guzzle bottled water, you might be getting more than just H2O. An analysis of 259 bottles of water from 11 brands in nine countries (including the United States) found that 93% contained microplastics—tiny bits of plastic resulting from the breakdown of plastic materials in landfills and oceans. Levels of microplastics were about double what was found in tap water tested from various countries, according to the analysis. The study was conducted by the State University of New York and Orb Media, a nonprofit, U.S.-based journalism organization.

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Feeling Blue? Eating More Fiber Could Help

December 7, 2018

Lifting your spirits might be as easy as adding more beans and other fiber-rich foods to your plate. A study published in the journal Nutrition in October 2018 found that people who reported eating the most fiber overall (including from cereal grains, vegetables and fruits) had fewer depressive symptoms. The data came from 16,807 American adults enrolled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

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Question of the Month

December 7, 2018

For years, health experts have been beating us over the head about the importance of scaling back our salt intake for the sake of our heart health. Based on research findings, the World Health Organization recommends a daily consumption of less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium—one teaspoon of salt—as a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association is even stingier with the salt shaker—just 1,500 mg of sodium a day for individuals at risk of heart disease.

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To Eat Better, Don’t Pump Up the Jams

December 7, 2018

No wonder people tend to order fried wings and other nutritional duds at rowdy sports bars. A recent study from the University of South Florida’s Muma College of Business discovered that people tend to make healthier food choices in the presence of low-volume, softer music or background noise than they do in loud environments.

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When Diverse Diets Go Wrong

December 7, 2018

It’s common healthy-eating advice: Consume a greater variety of foods so your body gets all the necessary nutrients. But a research review of the topic by scientists affiliated with the American Heart Association found that dietary diversity can sometimes backfire.

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Can We All Learn to Love Broccoli?

December 7, 2018

From arugula to kale to radicchio, some of the healthiest foods tend to be the most bitter. That’s why many people won’t eat them. Well, it turns out the secret to eating more bitter-tasting foods may be—wait for it—simply eating more bitter foods.

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Alcohol Pushes Iron Over the Limit

December 7, 2018

Write this down as another way that drinking too much can be a health menace: In a study of African women, published in the journal Clinical Nutrition, British and South African researchers found that levels of ferritin, a protein that stores iron, were higher in drinkers than in nondrinkers. Ferritin levels are a predictor for all-cause mortality.

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A New Approach to Food Labeling

December 7, 2018

Maybe graphic health messages on food and beverage packaging like those that adorn cigarette boxes could steer people toward better eating habits.

An Australian study published in the journal Appetite asked participants to rate healthy and unhealthy foods and choose which they would like to eat at the end of the experiment. Next they were shown negative and positive health messages: Some were text only; others had pictures. Study participants then had another chance to rate their desire for the foods.

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Question of the Month

October 11, 2018

Popular Mediterranean diet study under fire: Do you still have confidence in published nutrition science?

Many people expect nutrition science to help them live a healthy, long life. Despite what often seems like contradictory advice (butter or no butter?), nutrition research has consistently presented a positive picture of the Mediterranean way of eating. But even mighty Med research isn’t immune to missteps.

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Fans of NFL Losers Are Fans of Fatty Food

October 11, 2018

Now that we are in the thick of football season, the jubilation or sadness that comes with rooting for the victors or the vanquished may influence eating behaviors come Monday. A study in the journal Psychological Science found that the outcome of an NFL game can alter fans’ eating habits a day later, for better or worse.

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Make it! Eat it! Share it!

October 11, 2018

There is even more evidence that you can eat walnuts to your heart’s content. Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health conducted a thorough review of 26 clinical trials with 1,059 subjects over a 25-year span, investigating the connection between walnut consumption and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including blood lipid levels.

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Weight Gain Is Bad News for Our Gustatory Mojo

October 11, 2018

Studies have shown that people with obesity have a blunted sense of taste, so they have to eat more richly flavored foods (more sugary and higher in fat) to glean as much sensory satisfaction from a meal as their leaner peers. This could help in understanding why heavier people have a hard time losing weight.

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Something’s Fishy With Fish Oil

October 11, 2018

Don’t like fish? Well, you might not be able to turn to the supplement aisle to get the same benefits for your heart. A Cochrane report exploring 79 randomized trials of more than 112,000 adults (both with and without heart disease) showed that increasing omega-3 intake, mainly from fish oil pills taken for at least 1 year, did not significantly prevent heart attacks, strokes or deaths in general.

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Caffeine’s Power to Up Your Game Is in Your Genes

October 11, 2018

It has flummoxed sports nutrition researchers for years: Why do some athletes get turbo-charged with caffeine while others do not see the same performance boost after a latte? Researchers from the University of Toronto appear to have unlocked the mystery, at least in relation to men. An investigation published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise shows that male athletes with a specific variation in the CYP1A2 gene, which impacts caffeine metabolism, benefited from caffeine ingestion before a cycling time trial.

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To Fight Diabetes, Jump on the Whole-Grain Train

October 11, 2018

The numbers are startling: About 30 million Americans—more than 9% of the population—have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Another 84 million have prediabetes, a condition of poor blood sugar control that often leads to type 2 diabetes. But it looks like adding whole grains to our diets could reduce the disease’s collective burden.

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A Salty Diet Might Be a Death Sentence for Beneficial Bugs

October 11, 2018

We’ve long known that a high-salt diet has a role in raising blood pressure for some people. Now German scientists have presented a potential mechanism not previously considered: Excessive salt intake may wipe out beneficial Lactobacillus bacteria in our guts. That can drive up blood pressure numbers and raise the risk for certain diseases like stroke, according to a June 2018 Medical News Today report on research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference.

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Full-Fat Dairy Makes a Comeback?

October 11, 2018

An ever-expanding pile of research papers is challenging the idea that we need to avoid full-fat varieties of dairy products like yogurt and milk. There may be no need to settle for fat-free versions that could be less satisfying: For instance, a new study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition involving more than 2,900 U.S. seniors aged 65 and above found that whole-fat dairy consumption appears to do little harm when it comes to cardiovascular disease.

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