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COVID-19 (Coronavirus): Updated information and resources from IDEA

Sample Class: Seated Exercises for Older Adults

Older adults are more susceptible to deficits in cardiovascular fitness, muscle mass, strength and power, which may ultimately lead to losses in physical function. The following chair-based format focuses on improving outcomes for older participants, especially those who may need the support of a chair during exercise. Ready, Set, Sit! offers the variety of three 15-minute training segments (cardiovascular, high intensity and strength/power), while targeting important components that boost overall function.

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Weight Training and Diabetes

At the medical clinic where I work as an exercise physiologist, a patient came to see me; let’s call him John. He was healthy, but his fasting blood glucose levels were high. He was in his mid-40s and had low muscle mass. John was not on medication and wanted to avoid it. He asked my advice.

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How to Help Participants Find Flow

For a moment, think about your own workouts. Tap into that feeling of being completely absorbed in your favorite fitness routine. Everything else fades away, and your entire focus is on the present moment. You feel confident in your body’s abilities, you’re challenging yourself, and you find great meaning in what’s happening now. You’re in the zone. Before you know it, your workout is over, and you can’t wait to do it again.

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Research Update: Explore the Value of Exercise for Women’s Health

Fitness pros have a unique opportunity to take a leadership role by guiding their female clients toward a healthier, movement-oriented lifestyle. This women’s health research update discusses contemporary scientific findings you can use to educate your clients and plan up-to-date programs. The five topics, chosen because of the strong influence they have on women’s health, are type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, anxiety disorders and menopause.

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How to Prepare for IDEA World 2018

Over the years, I’ve become a seasoned IDEA attendee—and I’ve come to learn a lot about how to maximize my experience at these awesome events. Here are my top tips for those planning to join us for the 2018 IDEA® World Convention:

Pack very flexibly! Rooms can get cold if you’re in a less-active session, and things can really heat up when you’re engaged in an energizing workout.

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Health at Every Size: A Sound Approach to Behavior Change

The correlation between obesity and chronic disease is well established (Bacon & Aphramor 2011; Bombak 2014; Penney & Kirk 2015). Causality, however, is not so clear (Bombak 2014).
For decades, efforts to fight chronic disease have focused primarily on obesity—encouraging dieting as the best way to lose weight. But even as the U.S. weight loss industry has grown to $58.6 billion annually, we haven’t seen significant improvements in rates of chronic disease (Bacon & Aphramor 2011).

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Shoulder Blades: The Right Moves

The shoulder blades, or scapulae, are critical links in the kinetic chain from the waist through the shoulders, up to the neck and down to the fingertips. Abnormalities in the position or movement of the shoulder blades—technically called scapular dyskinesis—can trigger pain and discomfort, especially among people who spend long hours sitting and using computers.

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What Fitness Pros Need to Know About New Blood Pressure Guidelines

New guidelines on high blood pressure made headlines late last year because they suggest that nearly half of all Americans have hypertension—up from about one-third under previous guidelines. This is big news for fitness professionals because regular exercise is an excellent tool for regulating blood pressure. In this issue, we’ll review what you need to know about the new blood pressure guidelines.

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Getting Better at Recovery

A growing body of research is shedding more light on the importance of resting after exercise—providing vital clues on measuring and enhancing the recovery process. These insights are welcome news to personal trainers and coaches who see the consequences of overtraining and inadequate recovery every day. This column discusses some of the latest research on assessing and managing recovery and advises on tactics that may help your clients recover from exercise.

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Fresh Tomatoes for Father’s Day

Looking for a good Father’s Day gift that puts Dad’s good health front and center? How about a box of ripe, fresh tomatoes? They contain lycopene, an antioxidant that could decrease his risk of stroke, according to one Finnish study. And plant-based diets that include foods rich in lycopene (tomato products, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava and papaya) have been associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer—the most common cancer for men in the U.S. and the second-leading cause of cancer death in U.S. men.

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Five Keys to Choosing and Protecting Your Fitness Brand Name

Picture this: You’re well over 6 months into perfecting a new fitness product—a speed jump rope you’re calling Cheetah Ropes—that has experienced wild success in your regional market. You’ve done all the right things up to this point. You’ve scrutinized and refined your business plan, poured resources into product development and distribution, and built up an enviable following on social media. The next step is to go national.

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The Actor’s Guide to Personal Training

If you had told me 13 years ago that I would have a successful personal training business today, I wouldn’t have believed you! At the time, I had my heart set on becoming an actor. But even though I secured a modest number of stage and screen roles, personal training emerged as a compelling passion. And though I miss performing for others, I’ve come to realize that the skills and techniques I learned as an actor have become integral to the success of my training business.

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Flexibility Plus

Stretching has become a controversial topic, and some research questions its efficacy. You may have wondered whether you should include stretches in your cooldowns. As a general rule of thumb, if it's weak, strengthen it; if it's sore, rub it; if it's locked, unlock it; and if it's tight, stretch it. This works in theory, but we don't know exactly what's going on with our participants' bodies. What we do know is that most people want to move more freely and with less pain.

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Honor Your Hunger

Ignoring hunger and restricting intake can trigger an impulse to overeat (Mathes et al. 2009). Becoming aware of and honoring biological hunger can help. While this sounds simple, it can be challenging. “Many people seem deathly afraid to trust their internal hunger cues,” Washington, D.C., dietitian Victoria Jarzabkowski, MS, RDN, says. “It shouldn’t be terrifying, but that just goes to show how out of touch most of us are with body awareness.”

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Fresh Insights on Fat

Fresh Insights on Fat
Fat tissues secrete proteins that influence diet and metabolism. What the latest science means to fitness pros.
By Robert Christner, MS & Len Kravitz, PhD

We've long understood that fat is the body's principal energy-storage tissue. However, it's now becoming clear that fat tissue is a major hormone-secreting organ, producing cell–signaling proteins called adipokines that play an important role in metabolism, feeding behaviors, glucose regulation and insulin control (Singla, Bardoloi & Parkash 2010; Al–Suhaimi & Shehzad, 2013).

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