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“Plant-Powered” Runs for Vegetarian Athletes

Farm Sanctuary, which has been rescuing neglected and abused farm animals for more than 30 years, has organized three “plant-powered” events—timed 10Ks, fun runs and noncompetitive walks. The first will be in New York City on June 10, the second in Los Angeles on September 23, and the third in San Francisco on November 11.

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Nut Allergies: They’re Not One-Size-Fits-All

Being allergic to one kind of nut may not oblige you to avoid all nut varieties, a new study suggests.
Published in the March issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the study looked at 109 patients at an allergy referral center and found that more than half who were allergic to one kind of tree nut passed the allergy tests for other nuts. (Common tree nuts include almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios and Brazil nuts. Peanuts are technically a legume, not a nut.)

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Ask the RD

Sanna Delmonico, MS, RDN, CHE, is on the faculty at The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, in Napa, California, where she teaches food safety, nutrition and gastronomy. As a dietitian nutritionist working in a culinary school, she makes it her goal to help students see the connection between good health and delicious food.
Question: Dried seaweed snacks are really popular these days—even my kids like them. How nutritious are they? What about other types of seaweed?

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In Season and Good for You: Cardoons

Trying to stick to a Mediterranean diet? You may want to add cardoons to your cooking repertoire. This thistle-like perennial Mediterranean native plant is closely related to artichokes, though the edible part is a silvery green-gray stalk, similar to celery—and it tastes like a combination of the two.

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More Vegetables and Fruit = Less Psychological Distress

Eating vegetables and fruit is associated with low psychological distress, according to a University of Sydney analysis of more than 60,000 adults aged 45 or older. The new study confirms British, Canadian and Swiss studies—which have found that eating moderate amounts of fruits and vegetables contributes to well-being and low risk of depression and distress—but suggests a stronger protective effect for women than for men.

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Death and Diet Dos and Don’ts

Nearly half of heart disease-related deaths are associated with eating or drinking certain foods, according to survey analyses reported in the March issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers looked at the diets of 702,308 people whose deaths in 2012 were due to heart disease, stroke or type 2 diabetes—putting them in the category of cardiometabolic deaths.

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Turn It Off: The Boob Tube–Obesity Connection

Adults who said they did not watch TV during family mealtimes were 37% less likely to be obese than adults who kept the TV on while eating as a family, according to a survey of 12,842 Ohio residents, reported in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics in February 2017. The survey also found that when all family meals were home-cooked, adults were 26% less likely to be obese than when no or only some family meals were home-cooked.
The number of family meals survey respondents ate each week had little impact on their obesity rates.

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Fresh Tomatoes for Father’s Day

Looking for a good Father’s Day gift that puts Dad’s good health front and center? How about a box of ripe, fresh tomatoes? They contain lycopene, an antioxidant that could decrease his risk of stroke, according to one Finnish study. And plant-based diets that include foods rich in lycopene (tomato products, watermelon, pink grapefruit, guava and papaya) have been associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer—the most common cancer for men in the U.S. and the second-leading cause of cancer death in U.S. men.

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Some People Are Genetically Predisposed to Be Overweight, Obese

According to a new study, certain continental Africans and African-Americans carry a genomic variant that causes them to be an average of 6 pounds heavier than those without it.
In this study, researchers hoped to zero in on a potential genetic basis for overweight and obesity levels among continental Africans. To this end, the scientists performed a genome-wide association study for body mass index (BMI) in 1,570 West Africans and then replicated the study in independent samples of West Africans and African-Americans.

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Water-Based Weight Loss Programs Help Older Women Manage Knee Problems

Ratcheting up the intensity of water workouts may help women lose weight without exacerbating knee pain, suggests a new study. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) affects around 13% of women aged 60 and older, and the condition can make it painful for them to exercise and lose weight. It can also become a Catch-22, because carrying excess weight can worsen the problem.

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