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Archive for October 2002

Updating Your Cuing Repertoire, Problem Solver

Updating Your Cuing Repertoire

Q: A:

I feel stuck in a cuing rut. Although I really try to vary my teaching cues, they still sound boring and repetitive, especially the cues related to alignment and form. Fortunately, none of my participants have complained–so far! Then again, maybe they are not listening. It’s so hard to tell. Any ideas and strategies to develop interesting, helpful new cues?

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Reaching Out to Newcomers

Reaching Out to Newcomers
By Lawrence Biscontini, MA

W

hen preparing to teach our group fitness classes, we sometimes overlook the participants who most need our

help: the new attendees. Whether they are novice exercisers or just fresh faces in our own classes, these students tend to gravitate to the far recesses of the room, where they can’t see or hear properly. It’s a Catch-22 situation that…

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Reaching Out to Newcomers

Our job is to find ways to reach out to these back-row participants while still giving our seasoned students what they have come to expect. Here are some proven practical strategies that can help you extend a hand to even the most timid participants. ‰ Supplement to November-December 2002 IDEA Health & Fitness Source

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What Older Adults Want

At the 2002 World Fitness IDEA® convention, held this past summer in San Diego, the hot topic among attendees was teaching older adults. As all of this year’s IDEA award recipients emphasized in their acceptance remarks, not only is it cool and fun to teach the older-adult population, but it’s prudent as well. With the baby boomer wave cresting, teaching older adults really is an investment in your own future!

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Updating Your Cuing Repertoire

Q:I feel stuck in a cuing rut. Although I really try to vary my teaching cues, they still sound boring and repetitive, especially the cues related to alignment and form. Fortunately, none of my participants have complained—so far! Then again, maybe they are not listening. It’s so hard to tell. Any ideas and strategies to develop interesting, helpful new cues?

Read More