Harold E.'s Videos

by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
This exercise demands complete integration of your entire neuromuscular system. You must stabilize your scapula (shoulder blade) and lift out of the glenohumeral joint - GHJ (shoulder joint). You will develop complete awareness and mobilization the entire lateral chain.

The supporting hand is usually placed directly under the GHJ but I am placing it at a 90 degree angle in relation to the spine.

by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
In society today, many people sit at their jobs or hunch over during there time at work. This leads to the weekening of the muscles involved with moving and stabilizing the scapulas. This exercise helps to educate the mucsles that elevate the scapulas (shoulder blades), inwardly rotate the scapulas, retract the scapulas and depress the scapulas,
by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
This variation on 'Vajrasana' (the kneeling pose) is good for people who are experiencing knee (joint) problems. Please proceed carefully with this exercise. Initially, do it only for a few minutes and gently work up to around 10 minutes. If you are doing this subsequent to any knee operation, please consult with your physian or your therapist.
by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
This exercise is great for educating the proper shoulder blade placement onto the back of the rib cage and maintaining good scapulothoracic rhythm. It also assists in keeping the chest musculature from becoming dominant, especially if you sit all day.
by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
This movement is initiated from the hip as the shoulders are (depressed and retracted through the scapula) grounded into the mat. The erector spinae and transversospinalis muscle groups are of particular importance here. The former groups are a major factor in spinal extension. The latter groups are interconnected to each individual vertebrae. This allows them to mobilize each vertebrae independently of the others. The Hamstrings are the prime movers for this action.
by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
Developing core stability as relates to functional movement execution. you will need a bath towel and an appropriately weight book (a small paperback will do as you begin this drill). This drill is meant to be a supplementary drill. Although one's power in technique may be adequate, there is still the question of core stability. This drill will help in the development of that stability.
by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
Developing core stability as relates to functional movement execution. you will need a bath towel and an appropriately weight book (a small paperback will do as you begin this drill). This drill is meant to be a supplementary drill. Although one's power in technique may be adequate, there is still the question of core stability. This drill will help in the development of that stability.
by Harold E. Rose, Jr.
This exercise is good for establishing core stabilization and balance. The hip-knee-ankle on the left side of the body and the hip-knee-ankle on the right side of the body are addressed independent of each other. Imbalances are equalized because the body is trained to be unilaterally stable. Many activities engender developing the strength and functionality of on side of the body over the other. The body should be bilaterally even. By equalizing left/right imbalances, the body can continue to be active.