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Stretching’s Impact on Strength

by Ryan Halvorson on Apr 24, 2013

Making News

To stretch or not to stretch for improved strength is a question that endures. Some support the practice; others don’t. A new study may have put the debate to rest.

Published in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research (2012; doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31828054b7), the study aimed to determine what impact—if any—stretching would have on strength production. The researchers employed three procedures: a warm-up plus static stretch before each session; a stretch prior to each training set; and no stretch at all throughout the session. Thirty participants were divided among the three groups for 10 weeks. The strength component featured eight exercises performed at an 8-repetition maximum. The researchers measured strength levels and basal serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) before and after the intervention.

Final data revealed strength improvements across all exercises for the no-stretch group, but only in some exercises for both stretching groups. The no-stretch group also showed increases in IGF-1 postexercise, whereas the others did not.

The authors concluded that strength can improve with a prestretch, an in-workout stretch or no stretch at all—but in this study, the most significant impact on both strength and IGF-1 occurred among the no-stretch group.

IDEA Fitness Journal, Volume 10, Issue 5

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About the Author

Ryan Halvorson

Ryan Halvorson IDEA Author/Presenter

Ryan Halvorson is the associate editor for IDEA Health & Fitness Association; a Performance Specialist at Bird Rock Fit in La Jolla, CA; a Master Instructor for Metabolic Effect and the creator of www...